info@alleghenywest.org
806 Western Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15233

Max Klein

Max Klein was a wholesale liquor dealer in Pittsburgh between the 1870s and 1890s, operating stores on lower Federal Street in Allegheny City and at 410 Market Street, Downtown. Klein was a Bavarian immigrant and a Civil War veteran.

Records of the 1890 manuscript census, which would provide information on the Klein family and any other residents of 935 Beech Avenue in that year, were destroyed in a warehouse fire following the completion of the census. Records of the 1880 census, taken four to five years before the Klein family moved to 935 Beech Avenue, provide some information on the family. In 1880, Max Klein was 37 years old and his wife, Henrietta, was 28. The couple then had three children: Leah, seven, Arthur H., five and Milton, born in September 1879. The Kleins employed two servants, Rosina Rogers and Gertrude Smith, who lived in their home. The size of the house at 935 Beech Avenue, together with Max Klein’s continuing success in business, strongly suggests that the family also had live-in help at that address.

After moving from 935 Beech Avenue in 1891-1892, the Klein family lived at 911 Beech Avenue. The family remained at that address into the early 20th century.

The Klein family does not appear to have been related to the Klee family.

The Klees

Joseph and Rosa Klee were both born in Prussia, Joseph in 1824-1825 and Rosa in 1834-1835. Known records do not indicate whether the couple were married before or after they came to the United States. Joseph Klee may have immigrated with a brother, Jacob, who was his business partner in Pittsburgh between the late 1850s and the early 1880s. Jacob Klee, according to Jacob Feldman, became an American citizen in 1854 in Philadelphia, and it is possible that Joseph Klee did the same.

Rosa Klee

Rosa Klee in Later Life

Jacob Feldman found that in the 1850s, “Most Jews in Pittsburgh concentrated in four business lines: liquors, livestock, dry goods and men’s clothing.” Joseph Klee was involved in the manufacture and sale of men’s clothing with most of the businesses in which he is known to have been a principal. Klee was listed in the Pittsburgh city directory for the first time in 1857, as a partner in J. Klee & Company, shoe merchants, on Federal Street in the present vicinity of PNC Park. In about 1858 Joseph and Jacob Klee and an in-law, Simon Kaufman, formed Klee, Kaufman & amp; Klee, tailors and wholesale clothiers, on Federal Street in the same area. Both firms operated on Federal Street through the early 1860s.

Joseph and Jacob Klee were partners in their longest-lasting venture, J. Klee & Brother, wholesale clothiers, between approximately 1860 and the early 1880s. The firm was located on Federal Street in Allegheny City in the 1860s, and on Wood Street, Downtown, in the 1870s and 1880s. After Jacob Klee left in about 1882, the firm continued briefly as J. Klee & Son at 805 Liberty Avenue before Joseph Klee became the sole owner. Klee retired in about 1886.

The Klee family lived on or near lower Federal Street in the 1850s and 1860s. The family moved by the mid-1870s to Allegheny West, living in a house then known as 5 Lincoln Avenue, between Allegheny Avenue and the present Rooney house at 940 North Lincoln Avenue. The 1880 census enumerated the family at that address. Joseph Klee, 55, was listed as a merchant tailor, and Rosa Klee, 45, had no occupation. The couple had eight children living at home: Bennie, 18, a salesman, and Laura, 17, Amanda, 15, Simon, 13, Leo, 11, Nettie, nine, Winfield, six and Carrie Oppenheimer, 22, who was married to Sol Oppenheimer, 27, a merchant.

In the early 1880s, the Klee family moved to Western Avenue. The family remained there until 1884-1885, when they moved to 36 (now 927) Beech Avenue, at the eastern end of what became known as Klee Row. By the time that Klee Row was built, the Klees were prominent in Pittsburgh’s social circles. In 1888, The Social Mirror, a book listing well-known Pittsburgh families, reported that:

In one of a pretty new block of houses in Allegheny, which he recently built, Mr. Joseph Klee and his family reside. Mrs. Klee is a pleasant mannered, good-looking woman, and quite a favorite in her social circle.

The Klees were also listed in Pittsburgh Blue Books, or social registers, which began publication in the 1880s.

Joseph Klee lived at 927 Beech Avenue until his death in 1889. Rosa Klee lived in the house until 1907, sharing the house with the family of a daughter and son-in-law, Tillie and Henry Herzog. Rosa Klee sold Klee Row in 1907, at age 72. She appears to have died or left Pittsburgh within a short time after she sold the property.

935 Beech Avenue

935 Beech Avenue (Front)

Photo by Jim Parrish

Introduction

Joseph Klee and his wife, Rosa Klee, had the row of houses at 927-935 Beech Avenue built in 1884-1885. The houses, now known as Klee Row, were constructed on property that Joseph Klee had purchased from members of the Denny family for $13,125 in December 1883. Klee Row was built in the Second Empire style, as shown in its mansard roof. The houses’ smooth-cut stone sills and lintels and brick corbels are typical of late Second Empire houses, built in Pittsburgh beginning in the mid-1880s. The houses display the secondary influence of the Queen Anne style in their dormers, with steep roofs and ornamented vergeboards, and in their fishscale roof shingles.

Joseph and Rosa Klee were both Prussian immigrants. Joseph Klee was a clothing manufacturer and wholesaler in Allegheny City (now the Northside) and Pittsburgh between the 1850s and the 1880s.

Joseph and Rosa Klee lived at 927 Beech Avenue, in Klee Row’s easternmost house, and rented other houses in the row to tenants, some of whom were family members. The first occupants of 935 Beech Avenue were Max Klein, a wholesale liquor dealer, and his family. Pittsburgh city directories listed Max Klein at 28 (now 935) Beech Avenue between 1885 and 1891. Klein, who was bom in Bavaria, was also a Civil War veteran.

Isaac G. and Amanda Klee Trauerman lived at 935 Beech Avenue between 1892 and 1897. The couple were married in 1889-1890, and lived with the Klee family at 927 Beech Avenue before they moved to 935 Beech Avenue. Isaac G. Trauerman was a partner in a family-owned business, B.S. Trautman & Company, livestock dealers, while he and his family resided at 935 Beech Avenue.

In the early 20th century, 935 Beech Avenue housed some of the pastors of Calvary United Methodist Church at Beech and Allegheny avenues. The Rev. George W. Izer lived at 935 Beech Avenue at the time of the 1900 census. The house was occupied by the families of the Rev. James M. Thobum in 1910 and the Rev. William Baumgartner in 1920.

The house at 935 Beech Avenue has now had a total of 12 owners.

Detailed information on the history of 935 Beech Avenue is contained in the following report.

Ownership

  • December 24, 1883
  • March 28, 1884
  • September 24, 1884
  • December 11, 1889
  • October 14, 1907
  • May 13, 1908
  • June 18, 1908
  • March 1, 1919
  • May 28, 1919
  • May 28, 1919
  • October 29, 1943
  • February 7, 1975
  • July 15, 1977
  • October 15, 1980
  • March 8, 1983
  • July 30, 1984

Margaret S. Denny, Henry S. and Irene A. Denny, Janies O’Hara Denny and Francis H. Denny, all of Pittsburgh, conveyed property containing the present site of 927-935 Beech Avenue to Joseph Klee of Allegheny City (now the Northside) for $13,125. The property that was conveyed was described as being located on the southern side of Beech Avenue, 256′ east of Allegheny Avenue, and measuring 105′ wide along Beech Avenue by 137’4.5″ deep to Pasture Alley. The property was known as Lots 38, 39, 40 and 41 and part of Lot 37 in Block 2 of Elizabeth F. Denny’s Plan of Lots, located in the Second Ward of Allegheny City (Plan Book Volume 6, Page 193).

(Deed Book Volume 452, Page 653)

Joseph and Rosa Klee of Allegheny City conveyed 935 Beech Avenue or the lot on which the house stands to Tillie Herzog of Allegheny City, their daughter and the wife of Henry Herzog, for $2,500. The lot that was conveyed was described as being located on the southern side of Beech Avenue, 256′ east of Allegheny Avenue, and measuring 20′ wide along Beech Avenue by 137’4.5″ deep to Pasture Alley.

(DBV 477 P 594)

Henry and Tillie Herzog of Allegheny City conveyed 935 Beech Avenue or the lot on which the house stands to Joseph Klee of Allegheny City for $2,500. The lot that was conveyed was described as being located on the southern side of Beech Avenue, 256′ east of Allegheny Avenue, and measuring 20′ wide along Beech Avenue by 137’4.5″ deep to Pasture Alley.

(DBV 505 P 157)

Joseph Klee died on December 11, 1889.

Rosa Klee, widow, of Allegheny City conveyed the row of houses at 927-935 Beech Avenue and property on Wightman Street in Squirrel Hill to Annie McCutcheon, widow, of Pittsburgh for $65,000. The row at 927-935 Beech Avenue occupied a parcel measuring 108′ wide by 137’4″ deep.

(DBV 1553 P 425)

Annie McCutcheon, widow, of Pittsburgh conveyed 927-935 Beech Avenue to the Penn Realty Company for $1 and other considerations.

(DBV 1605 P 144)

The Penn Realty Company conveyed 927-935 Beech Avenue to Emily A. Arthur, widow, of Bellevue, for $40,000.

(DBV 1607 P 183)

The estate of Emily A. Arthur conveyed 927-935 Beech Avenue to Arthur F. Schmidt, Herbert W. Schmidt, Julius W. Schmidt and Philipp E. Schmidt, all of Pittsburgh, for $23,700.

(DBV 1930 P 568)

Arthur F. Schmidt, Herbert W. Schmidt, Julius W. Schmidt and Philipp E. Schmidt, all of Pittsburgh, conveyed 935 Beech Avenue to Michael and Catherine Gavan of Pittsburgh for $6,250. This deed and subsequent deeds conveyed the lot on which the house now stands, measuring 20.29’ wide along Beech Avenue by 137.38′ deep.

(DBV 1979 P 111)

Michael Gavan died on March 15, 1933. He was survived by Catherine Gavan, who died on February 27, 1934. Catherine Gavan was survived by three children: Katharine, John J. and James Gavan. James Gavan died on August 26, 1942.

John J. and Ellen Gavan and Katharine Gavan, all of Pittsburgh, conveyed 935 Beech Avenue to Wilbert C. and Mary Miller of Pittsburgh for $1 and other considerations (tax stamps indicate a price of $4,000).

Wilbert C. Miller died on October 16, 1958.

(DBV 2788 P 16)

Mary Miller, widow, of Pittsburgh conveyed 935 Beech Avenue to King North Development Company for $15,000.

(DBV 5400 P 67)

King North Development Company conveyed 935 Beech Avenue to John L. DeSantis of Pittsburgh for $20,000.

(DBV 5805 P 653)

John L. DeSantis of Pittsburgh conveyed 935 Beech Avenue to Pierce R. and Carol H. Smith for $57,500.

(DBV 6309 P 220)

Pierce R. and Carol A. Smith conveyed 935 Beech Avenue to Charles S. Lenzner, Dwight E. Lenzner and Marion E. Lenzner, sons and mother, for $123,300.

(DBV 6643 P 607)

James E. Parrish purchased 935 Beech Avenue from Charles S. Lenzner and Dwight E. Lenzner on July 30, 1984. Title to the property was placed in the names of James E. Parrish and Christiane Siewers on November 12, 1998 (DBV 10345 P 558).

DBV 694 P 375)

Age of the House

Construction

Joseph and Rosa Klee had the row of houses at 927-935 Beech Avenue constructed between 1884 and 1885.

Plat maps published in 1872 and 1882 show that 927-935 Beech Avenue had not yet been built. Joseph Klee purchased property containing the site of the five houses on December 24, 1883. Klee paid $13,125 for the lot, which measured 105′ wide along Beech Avenue by 137.38′ deep. This purchase, at 91 cents per square foot, was comparable to prices paid for other undeveloped lots in Allegheny West at the time, and indicates that 927-935 Beech Avenue had not yet been built.
An 1884 fire insurance map shows that 927-935 Beech Avenue had not yet been built. The 1885 Pittsburgh city directory listed Joseph Klee as living at 36 (now 927) Beech Avenue for the first time. The 1885 directory also listed Max Klein at 28 (935) Beech Avenue for the first time. An 1890 plat map confirms that 927-935 Beech Avenue had been built.

Architectural Style

Joseph and Rosa Klee had the row of houses at 927-935 Beech Avenue built in a late version of the Second Empire style.

In urban neighborhoods like Allegheny West, where high land costs discouraged construction of houses with more than about 22′ frontage, Second Empire house exteriors were characterized primarily by mansard front roofs, arched door and window openings, prominent or projecting door and window hoods, and decorative brackets supporting box gutters. Second Empire homes in suburban and rural settings were built with full mansard roofs, and sometimes with centered wings or towers. Most local Second Empire homes featured two-over-two double hung windows, although some later or larger examples were constructed with one-over-one double-hung windows.

In the late version of the Second Empire style, shown at 927-935 Beech Avenue, smooth-cut stone window hoods with little or no ornamentation replaced the earlier arched and/or projecting hoods, and brick corbels replaced wood brackets. The row at 927-935 Beech Avenue is also among many late Second Empire houses that show the secondary influence of the Queen Anne style, which was popular locally between about 1885 and the late 1890s. At 927-935 Beech Avenue, the Queen Anne style is shown in the houses’ dormers, both in the steepness of the dormer roofs and in the ornamentation of the vergeboard, and in the fishscale roof shingles.
The Second Empire style and the related Italianate style were the prevailing architectural styles for homes and small commercial buildings constructed in the Pittsburgh area between the late 1860s and about 1885. The late Second Empire style was used between approximately 1885 and the late 1890s. The 1884-1885 construction of 927-935 Beech Avenue, among the earliest late Second Empire houses in Pittsburgh, together with the large size of the houses, suggests that the row was architect-designed. Known records, however, do not identify an architect who is credited with design of 927-935 Beech Avenue.

Residents

The Klees

Pittsburgh city directories, U.S. census records, and a book, The Jewish Experience in Western Pennsylvania by Jacob Feldman, provide information on Joseph and Rosa Klee, the first owners of 927-935 Beech Avenue.

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Max Klein

Max Klein was listed in Pittsburgh directories as living at 28 (935) Beech Avenue between 1885 and 1891.

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The Trauermans

Pittsburgh directories listed Isaac G. Trauerman at 28 (935) Beech Avenue for six consecutive years beginning in 1892.

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The 1900 Census

Records of the 1900 census are the earliest surviving census records that provide information on occupants of 935 Beech Avenue. The 1900 census was taken not long after Calvary Methodist Episcopal Church (now Calvary United Methodist Church) at Beech and Allegheny avenues began using the house as a residence for its ministers, in addition to its rectory at 939 Beech Avenue.
In 1900, 935 Beech Avenue was occupied by the Rev. George W. Izer, 50, and his wife Emma F. Izer, 46. The Reverend Izer was a native of Maryland; Emma F. Izer 46, had been born in Pennsylvania. The couple, married for 20 years, had no children, and were the only residents of the house.

The 1910 Census

The Reverend James M. and Emma F. Thoburn and their children lived at 935 Beech Avenue at the time of the 1910 census. James M. Thoburn, 53, had been bom in Ohio, and Emma F. Thoburn, 50, had been born in Pennsylvania. The couple had had four children, three of whom were living: Ruth, 26, Jean, 22, both with no occupation, and Margaret, 13.
Census records indicate that Jean Thoburn was bom in India, while her father was engaged in missionary work there; Ruth Thobum was born in New York state, and Margaret in Michigan.

The 1920 Census

The Rev. William Baumgartner, 38, and his wife, Elizabeth H., 37, were the only occupants of 935 Beech Avenue when the 1920 census was taken.
William Baumgartner had been born in Ohio, to parents born in Maryland and Pennsylvania; Elizabeth H. Baumgartner was born in Delaware to Irish immigrant parents.

The 1930 Census

Michael and Catherine Gavan, who had purchased 935 Beech Avenue in 1919, were enumerated in the house with their children in the 1930 census.

Michael Gavan, 69, was a foreman in a gas works. He and Catherine Gavan, 68, had both come to the United States from Ireland in 1880. The couple, married in or about 1891, had three unmarried children who lived with them at 935 Beech Avenue: Katharine, 38, employed as a social secretary in a private home, John J., 35, a moving van driver and James J., 32, a clerk working for a drug company.
Records of the 1930 census also indicate that 935 Beech Avenue had an estimated value of $10,000, and that the Gavan family owned a “radio set.”

The 1930 census is the most recent census that provides detailed information on occupants of 935 Beech Avenue. Manuscript census records are withheld from the public for 72 years, to protect the privacy of persons enumerated.

Neighborhood Development

Klee Row, at 927-935 Beech Avenue, was built as Beech Avenue and nearby streets began to develop as a genteel alternative to sections of Allegheny City like the east and south commons and the Anderson Street area, which were crowded and contained mixed residential, commercial and industrial uses by 1870. Most of the original residents of the houses of the type that line Beech Avenue were merchants who previously lived in older sections of Allegheny City. Many had moved to Allegheny City from Downtown Pittsburgh around the time of the Civil War.

Learn More

Supplementary Materials

The following materials accompany this report:


A Researched History
By: Carol J. Peterson

all photos by Chris Siewers, unless otherwise noted

The Bells

John S. Bell was born in Ireland in about 1838. Eliza Bell was born in Pennsylvania in about 1836.

By the late 1850’s, the future Eliza Bell was the wife of Robert McKee, a salesman. The couple lived in Allegheny (now the Northside), on Federal Street near Jackson (now Jacksonia) Street. John S. Bell began boarding with the McKee family by 1860.

The 1860 manuscript census enumerated a household headed by Robert McKee in Allegheny’s Second Ward. The census reported that Robert McKee, 25, was a native of Ireland who worked as a salesman, and that Eliza McKee, 24, had no occupation. Robert McKee owned no real estate and had no “personal estate,” or cash savings, but Eliza McKee owned real estate worth $1,000 and had a personal estate of $5,000.

In 1860, Robert and Eliza McKee had three children: John B., four, Amelia, two, and Christian, five months. All of the McKee children had been born in Pennsylvania.

The 1860 census reported that John S. Bell, 22, was a clerk who boarded with the McKee family. Bell was reported to own no real estate and have no personal estate.

A servant, Mary Kress, also lived with the McKee family in 1860. Mary Kress was 18 years old and had been born in Ireland.

City directories show that the McKee family and John S. Bell moved from Federal Street to 67 Logan Street in the Hill District (on or near the site of the Civic Arena) in 1861 or 1862. By 1863, Robert McKee died, and Eliza McKee and John S. Bell moved to 71 Logan Street. John S. Bell and Eliza McKee were married in 1863 or 1864. Shortly after their marriage, the Bells moved to 294 Penn Avenue in Pittsburgh.

In 1865, John S. Bell became a partner in Bates & Bell, dry goods merchants, located at 21 Fifth Avenue. Bell’s
partner was Alexander Bates of Highland Avenue in East Liberty. The Bates & Bell partnership lasted until 1869.
The Bell family moved to 52 Ferry Street in Pittsburgh in 1865 and lived at that address through 1867. In 1867, the Bells’ neighbors included Harry Darlington, who built a four-story mansion at 721 Brighton Road about 24 years later. In 1867, Harry Darlington was the owner of a brewery and lived at 35 Ferry Street.

The 1868 city directory listed John S. Bell as living on Beech Street near Grant Street (now Galveston Street).

The 1870 directory listed John S. Bell as a partner in Bell & Moorhouse, dry goods merchants. Bell’s partner was John L. Moorhouse of 118 Centre Avenue in the Hill District. Bell & Moorhouse was located at 21 Fifth Avenue, the former location of Bates & Bell. This partnership lasted only one year.

The 1870 manuscript census enumerated John S. and Eliza Bell at 47 Beech Street with their six children and a servant. In 1870, the Bells’ children were Amelia, 11, Charles, seven and William, five, all attending school, and Bessie, three, John B., two and James, five months, at home. All of the Bells’ children had been born in Pennsylvania.

The Bell family’s servant was Frances Pleasant, 27, who had been born in Ohio.

The 1870 manuscript census, which was the last census to provide information on assets of persons enumerated, reported that John S. Bell owned real estate valued at $141,500 and had a personal estate of $1,000.

City directories indicate that after selling 47 Beech Avenue in 1870, John S. and Eliza Bell moved their family to Jacks Run Road in Bellevue. During the 1870’s John S. Bell was listed in city directories as an agent.

The 1880 manuscript census enumerated the Bell family living in an unnumbered house on Jacks Run Road. John S. Bell was employed as a millinery agent, and Eliza Bell did not work.

In 1880, the census reported that the Bells’ children were Charles, 16, William, 14, Bessie, 11, Bates, nine, Nellie, six, James, five and Frederick, four. According to census records, only William Bell attended school.

During the 1880’s, John S. and Eliza Bell experienced financial difficulties, losing some of their property in Bellevue at sheriff’s sale and selling other property to the person who had foreclosed on them. John S. Bell last appeared in the Pittsburgh city directory in 1884.

912 Beech Avenue

912 Beech Avenue (Front)

Introduction

912 Beech Avenue is a three-story red brick house occupying a 30′ wide by 100′ deep lot located in the Allegheny West section of Pittsburgh.

John S. Bell, an Irish-born dry goods merchant, and his wife Eliza had 912 Beech Avenue built in 1869 or 1870. The Bells and their children and servant lived at 912 Beech Avenue for only a year or less before they sold the house and moved to Bellevue.

Henry Meyer, an attorney who owned 912 Beech Avenue between 1886 and 1909, had the house updated in the late 1880’s. Meyer’s alterations to 912 Beech Avenue, which included a new facade, stairway, doors, mantels, woodwork and hardwood floors, incorporated fashionable home features of the time while leaving intact a number of items that date to the time of the house’s construction.

Other early occupants of 912 Beech Avenue included the family of Moses Bauer, a Prussian immigrant jewelery store owner who rented the house in 1880.

912 Beech Avenue, originally known as 47 Beech Street, has had 19 owners. The house was converted to a rooming house by the late 1920’s and was allowed to deteriorate until its 1991 restoration.

Detailed information on the ownership history, age, and first owner of 912 Beech Avenue follows.

Ownership

  • April 30, 1869
  • August 16, 1870
  • March 1, 1882
  • September 25, 1882
  • October 22, 1883
  • December 14, 1886
  • July 9, 1909
  • April 10, 1912
  • January 30, 1915
  • June 12, 1918
  • March 29, 1919
  • January 10, 1920
  • January 10, 1920
  • July 20, 1921
  • April 11, 1922
  • March 11, 1946
  • May 1, 1959
  • April 27, 1966
  • March 6, 1973
  • May 23, 1990
  • December 19, 1990

Arthur and Bell Hobson, Joseph and Jessie McNaugher and Samuel and Jane McNaugher, all of Allegheny City, to Eliza Bell, $4,000.

This deed conveyed lots 23 and 24 in Block 4 in Elizabeth F. Denny’s Plan of Lots, located in the Second Ward of Allegheny City. The property conveyed was located on the northern side of Beech Street (now Beech Avenue), 440′ east of Allegheny Avenue, and measured 40′ wide along Beech Street and 100′ deep to Butter Cup Alley (now Buttercup Way).

(Deed Book Volume 244, Page 243)

John S. and Eliza Bell of Allegheny City to Ralph Bagaly, son of William Bagaly of Allegheny City, $13,000.

This deed conveyed Lots 23 and 24 and the western half of Lot 25 in Block 4 in Elizabeth F. Denny’s Plan of Lots, measuring 50′ along Beech Street and 100′ deep to Butter Cup Alley.

(DBV 261 P 114)

Ralph and Mary A. Bagaly of the city of Pittsburgh to William Semple of Allegheny City, $7,000. This deed and subsequent deeds conveyed a 30′ wide by 100′ deep lot on Beech Avenue, 460′ east of Allegheny Avenue.

(DBV 424 P 679)

William and Marion Semple of Allegheny City to August G. Hatry of the city of Pittsburgh, $10,000.

(DBV 442 P 686)

August and Louisa Hatry of the city of Pittsburgh to Alexander M. Byers of Allegheny City, $8,000.

(DBV 466, P 682)

Alexander M. and Martha F. Byers of Allegheny City to Mattie E. Meyer of the city of Pittsburgh, $6,500.

(DBV 558, P 254)

Henry and Mattie E. Meyer of the city of Pittsburgh to John Goettmann of the city of Pittsburgh, $1 and other good and valuable considerations.

(DBV 1645 P 88)

John Goettmann, widower, of the city of Pittsburgh, to Enoch James of the city of Pittsburgh, $1 and other valuable considerations.

(DBV 1713 P 615)

Enoch and Annie James of the city of Pittsburgh to Henry H. Daubenspeck of Washington Township, Butler County, $1 and other good and valuable considerations.

(DBV 1832 P 199)

Henry H. and Elizabeth J. Daubenspeck of Washington Township, Butler County, to Roscoe M. Daubenspeck of the city of Pittsburgh, $1 and other good and valuable considerations.

(DBV 1944 P 3)

Roscoe M. Daubenspeck, unmarried, of the city of Pittsburgh to Grace E. and Phillip J. Artz Jr. of the city of Pittsburgh, $1 and other valuable considerations.

(DBV 1951 P 487)

Grace E. and Phillip J. Artz Jr. of the city of Pittsburgh to Kathryn D. Float of the city of Pittsburgh, $1 and other valuable considerations.

(DBV 2004 P 451)

Kathryn D.. Float, unmarried, of the city of Pittsburgh to Grace E. Artz of the city of Pittsburgh, $1 and other valuable considerations.

(DBV 2004 P 449)

Grace E. and Phillip J. Artz Jr. of the city of Pittsburgh to Martin and Catharine Schmidt of the city of Pittsburgh, $8.700.

(DBV 2071 P 200)

Martin and Catharine Schmidt of the city of Pittsburgh to Adam Kerr of the city of Pittsburgh, $9,000.

(DBV 2125 P 408)

Nettie Kerr, widow, Lela and Glenn E. Hilliard and Florence and Presley Albert Traft, all of the city of Pittsburgh, and Roy M. and Mary Kerr of Southgate, California, to George S. and Edna C. Harger of Evans City, Butler County, $1.

Adam Kerr had died on April 26, 1945, and left one-third interest in the property to his wife Nettie Kerr and two-thirds interest in the property to his children.

(DBV 2887 P 568)

Edna C. Harger, widow, of Evans City, Butler County, to Niels Bork of Evans City, Butler County, $8,500.

(DBV 3792 P 318)

Niels and Anne Louise Bork of Mercer, Butler County to Edward R. and Gay L. Hilderhoff of the city of Pittsburgh, $12,000.

(DBV 4328 P 613)

Edward R. and Gay L. Hilderhoff of the city of Pittsburgh to Joseph F. Coyne of the city of Pittsburgh, $13,700.

(DBV 4664 P 181)

Joseph F. Coyne, single, to Louis DePellegrini, $27,000.

(DBV 8253 P 525)

Louis DePellegrini, single, of the city of Pittsburgh to Barbara A. and Robert L. Wells Jr. of the city of Pittsburgh, $49,000.

(DBV 8394, P 583)

Age of the House

All available information indicates that John S. and Eliza Bell had 912 Beech Avenue built in 1869 or 1870.

The April 30, 1869 sale of a 40′ wide by 100′ deep lot on Beech Avenue for $4000, at $1 per square foot, was comparable to prices paid for other undeveloped lots in Allegheny West and indicates that 912 Beech Avenue had not been built.

Subsequently, the 1870 Pittsburgh city directory listed John S. Bell as living at 47 Beech Street (now 912 Beech Avenue) for the first time.
Pittsburgh city directories of the late 1860’s provide information on Arthur Hobson, Joseph McNaugher and Samuel McNaugher, who, with their wives, sold Eliza Bell property on which 912 Beech Avenue stands.

Arthur Hobson was a contractor who lived at 9 Knoll Street in Allegheny. Joseph McNaugher was a paver and contractor who lived at 268 Sandusky Street in Allegheny. Samuel McNaugher, a bricklayer, also lived on Sandusky Street.

Residents

The Bells

Pittsburgh city directories, and U.S. census records provide information on John S. and Eliza Bell and their family.

Learn More

Occupants in 1880

The 1880 manuscript census shows that 912 Beech Avenue (then 47 Beech Street) was rented to the family of Moses Bauer.

Moses Bauer, 30, was a Prussian-born jewelery store owner. His wife Laura, 25, kept house. Laura Bauer had been born in Pennsylvania to parents born in Baden, Germany.

In 1880, Moses and Laura Bauer lived at 47 Beech Street with their two children, Moses Bauer’s step-brother, and two female servants.
The Bauers’ children were Alice, two, and Walter, one. Both had been born in Pennsylvania.

Herm Cerf, Moses Bauer’s step-brother, was 18 and worked as a store clerk. He had been born in Prussia.

Servants living at 47 Beech Street in 1880 were M. Ackerman, 16, who had been born in Pennsylvania, and Millie Racy, 25, who had been born in Virginia and was not able to read or write. Both servants were the children of Prussian immigrants.

Other Information

Pittsburgh city directories indicate that 912 Beech Avenue was converted to a rooming house by 1929. In that year, Nettie Kerr was listed as proprietor of a rooming house at 912 Beech Avenue and living at the same address.

Supplementary Materials

The following materials accompany this report:

  • a copy of an 1872 plat map of part of Allegheny, including Beech Avenue
  • a copy of an 1890 plat map of part of Allegheny, including Beech Avenue
  • a copy of a 1910 plat map of part of the Northside, including Beech Avenue

A Researched History
By: Carol J. Peterson

all photos by Chris Siewers, unless otherwise noted

The Gerlachs

The 1920 and 1930 censuses enumerated Ann Gerlach’s husband, John Gerlach Jr., as the head of the household at 851 Beech Avenue. He had been born in Pennsylvania and was a son of German immigrants. In 1920, he was 38 years old and his occupation was listed as auto transportation. Records of the 1930 census list him as a broker in stocks and bonds.
Anna Gerlach, 39 in 1920, had been born in Pennsylvania like her parents. The Gerlach children were then Lawrence, 14, John E., 12, Crescentia, 11, Maria, nine, Anna, seven and Claude, four. The 1930 census, taken three and a half years after Ann Gerlach’s death, recorded four of the children still living at home: John E., 22, a laborer doing odd jobs, Marie, 20, with no occupation, Anna, 16, a department store saleswoman and Claude, 15.

The 1930 census indicates that the Gerlach family owned a “radio set,” like many middle class families, and that 851 Beech Avenue had an estimated value of $12,000. In 1940, as a result of the Great Depression’s effect on property values, the house’s estimated value was $8,000.

John Gerlach Jr. no longer lived at 851 Beech Avenue in 1940, having conveyed his interest in the house to his children in 1931. Records of the 1940 census list John E. Gerlach, 31, as the head of the household. He was employed as a Pittsburgh firefighter, and had worked 40 hours in the week before the census. In 1939 he had worked all 52 weeks, and earned $1,000. His wife Loretta, 29, and a Pennsylvania native, had no occupation. The couple had a son, Bernard, who was two years old. Claude Gerlach, 23, also still lived in the house. He was a college senior who was not working or seeking work at the time of the census, and had not worked in 1939.

The 1940 census was the first to collect information on educational levels. Census records show that John E. Gerlach had completed two years of college and Loretta Gerlach was a high school graduate.

The 1940 census is the last census that provides information on occupants of 851 Beech Avenue. Manuscript census records are withheld from public view for 72 years, to protect the privacy of persons who were enumerated.

The Holmeses (Charles)

Charles Holmes was born in or near Pittsburgh in September 1835. His father, Thomas Holmes, was a bricklayer who had been born in England. His mother, Jane, was from Ireland. Records of the 1850 census show that Thomas Holmes owned real estate valued at $3,700, roughly comparably to $300,000 today, indicating that the family lived comfortably. Thomas Holmes may have been a bricklaying contractor rather than an employee, a distinction that was sometimes not made in city directories and census records. In 1850, the Holmes family lived on Decatur Street in the lower Hill District.

The Holmes family left Pittsburgh during the first half of the 1850s, and Charles Holmes’ residence and activities during young adulthood are not known. Holmes returned to the city in or shortly before 1862, when he was listed in the city directory for the first time. He worked as a clerk, and boarded on Liberty Avenue, Downtown.

In about 1863, Holmes established C. Holmes & Company, a grocery store at the northwest corner of Third Avenue and Smithfield Street. He owned the store, later at the southeast corner of Second and Smithfield, until the late 1870s. He was still single, and boarded at various addresses around Downtown.

Holmes married Sarah “Sallie” A. Gilfillan Mastisson, about 36, a native of West Alexander, Washington County, on July 3,1879. Her parents were Silver Gilfillan, a carpenter and cabinet maker, and Marie Gilfillan, both born in Pennsylvania in the late 1790s. She had previously been married, but was a widow when she married Charles Holmes. She had no children during either of her marriages.

At around the time that he married, Charles Holmes left the grocery business and became a partner in the firm of Keller Morris & Holmes, sand and gravel dealers, on Water Street (now Fort Pitt Boulevard), Downtown. Holmes became a partner in the Keystone Sand Company in about 1881, and in the Monongahela Sand Company, possibly a successor firm, about 1884. The Monongahela Sand Company was located at 1825 Wharton Street on the South Side. Holmes remained with the latter business until about 1892, serving as its secretary and treasurer in the late 1880s and early 1890s.

In 1890, Holmes parlayed his gains from the sand and gravel business as a founder of the Mercantile Trust Company of Pittsburgh, at 413 Wood Street, Downtown. He left the Monongahela Sand Company in 1892 or 1893, when he became the Mercantile Trust Company’s bookkeeper. He was vice-president of the trust company by 1896. He also helped found the First National Bank of McKees Rocks in 1898, and was that institution’s first president. He served as vice-president of the Mortgage Banking Company after that firm was established in 1902.

Charles and Sallie Holmes lived at 425 and 435 Liberty Avenue, in the present Gateway Center area, between the early 1880s and early 1890s. In about 1891 they moved to 1617 Locust Street, in the present UPMC Mercy Hospital area. They remained at that address until they moved to 851 Beech Avenue in 1899.

Records of the 1900 census list Charles Holmes, 64, and Sallie Holmes, 56, as the only residents of 851 Beech Avenue. Census records also show that 851 Beech Avenue was not mortgaged.

While living on Beech Avenue, Charles and Sallie Holmes belonged to the First Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh on Sixth Avenue, Downtown. Charles Holmes had been a church deacon since 1874, was a member of the finance committee, and served as the congregation’s treasurer.

Pittsburgh directories published during the first several years after Charles and Sallie Holmes moved to Beech Avenue listed Holmes simply as a banker, possibly because of his association with more than one financial institution. Holmes retired in 1905. Census records from 1910 gave his occupation as “own income”, meaning that he was able to support himself without working.

In 1910, Charles and Sallie Holmes employed a private nurse, Sadie Taylor, who lived at 851 Beech Avenue. Taylor was a 33-year-old divorcee who was at least a second-generation Pennsylvania native. She probably cared for Sallie Holmes, who died in 1911,

Charles Holmes sold 851 Beech Avenue in 1913, and was not listed in subsequent Pittsburgh directories. When he died at Columbia Hospital in Wilkinsburg in 1916, his obituary reported that he had been living with a nephew in Ohio.

The Siebenecks

James J. Siebeneck was born in Mainz (or Mayence), Germany, on April 11, 1827. His parents were Franz and Clara Siebeneck. He arrived in the United States in 1848 or 1849, at age 21. He initially worked as a civil engineer and surveyor on canal and railroad projects. Siebeneck received his legal education in Towanda, Pennsylvania, where he served an apprenticeship known as reading law in the office of an established attorney between 1855 and 1857. He passed the bar in Towanda in 1857, and came to Pittsburgh in 1857 or 1858. He was listed in the Pittsburgh city directory for the first time in 1858, as an attorney at law whose office was on Grant Street, Downtown. He boarded at a different address on Grant Street.

On October 20, 1859, Siebeneck married Margaret E. Thomson McKinney, who had been born in Tennessee on April 11, 1825. Her parents were Archibald McKinney, born outside the United States and later a Pittsburgh resident, and Ann Watson McKinney, born in Pittsburgh. Ann Watson McKinney, according to information compiled by Allegheny West historian John Canning, was a daughter of Andrew Watson, an early Pittsburgh tavern keeper. James J. and Margaret Siebeneck had two children: James J. Jr., who was born in 1860 and died in infancy, and Clara H., who was born about 1862 and died in 1865.

After marrying, the Siebenecks lived in a boarding house in Wylie Avenue in the lower Hill District, then lived in what was probably their own home on the same street until 1869. During the Civil War James Siebeneck, a Republican like President Lincoln, was a strong Union supporter. He participated in a recruitment rally held on the West Common in Allegheny City on July 24, 1862, and contributed $50 to a bounty fund that rewarded volunteers for enlisting. He was among the speakers on the steps of the Pittsburgh main post office when the war ended three years later. His later participation in public life included serving on the Allegheny County Centennial [of the United States] Committee in 1876 and participating in dedication ceremonies for the new Allegheny County Courthouse in 1888.

The 1870 population census was the first census taken following the construction of 851 Beech Avenue. The census recorded James Siebeneck as an attorney who owned real estate worth $87,000, several times the value of his home, and had a personal estate of $6,500. Margaret, 44, kept house. The couple employed a servant who lived in their home: Mary Chambers, 22, who had been born in Ireland.

Margaret Siebeneck died on September 28, 1877, at age 51. Her death left James Siebeneck living alone at 851 Beech Avenue, except for household staff. The 1880 census enumerated two such residents of the house: Nancy Mcllevein, 66, a housekeeper born in Ireland, and Fanny Davis, 21, a servant who had immigrated from Wales. Records of the 1890 census, which would provide information on all occupants of 851 Beech Avenue in that year, were destroyed in a warehouse fire in Washington D.C. in the 1920s. By that time, Siebeneck had family members at close proximity, as a brother, Pittsburgh newspaper publisher Joseph G. Siebeneck, also a widower, and his family moved to 855 Beech Avenue in about 1887. Both Siebeneck brothers and Joseph’s family were listed in Pittsburgh and Allegheny Blue Books, or social directories, after publication began in the 1880s.

James Siebeneck practiced law on Grant Street and on Wylie Avenue at Fifth Avenue and Grant Street for the rest of his life. He may also have taken some cases in Beaver County, where he became licensed to practice in 1868. He died at home at 851 Beech Avenue on March 20,1896. His heirs sold his house in 1899.

851 Beech Avenue

851 Beech Avenue (Front)

Introduction

Alfred McDonald constructed 851 Beech Avenue in 1869. McDonald, a building contractor who lived at 853 Beech Avenue, constructed the house as a speculative venture. He purchased the lot on which the house stands in April 1869 for $2836, and sold the lot and house four months later for $9,000. The house is a good example of the Italianate style applied to a somewhat narrow urban house form, with arched front door surround and window hoods, rounded ornamental panels on its front door surround, and paired brackets below the box gutter and along the roofline on the east elevation.

Pittsburgh attorney Joseph J. Siebeneck bought 851 Beech Avenue from McDonald, and lived there for 27 years. Siebeneck, a German immigrant, settled in Pittsburgh in 1857 or 1858 after working on civil engineering projects and then studying law in Towanda, Pennsylvania. He and his wife, Margaret McKinney Siebeneck, lived in the lower Hill District from the time that they married until they moved to Beech Avenue. Joseph Siebeneck may have walked or taken a horsecar from Allegheny West to his law office in Grant Street in Downtown Pittsburgh.

The Siebenecks had no children who lived at 851 Beech Avenue. Census records document the presence of servants who lived in the house. Margaret Siebeneck died in 1877, and Joseph lived at 851 Beech until he died in 1896.

Charles Holmes purchased 851 Beech Avenue in 1899. Holmes was then vice-president of the Mercantile Trust Company and president of the First National Bank of McKees Rocks, both of which he had helped found in the 1890s. He also helped establish the Mortgage Banking Company in 1902, and served as treasurer of the First Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh. Holmes and his wife, Sallie, lived in the house into the early 1910s. Sallie Holmes died in 1911, and in 1913 Charles sold 851 Beech Avenue to Ann Lattner Gerlach, whose family owned die house until 2007.

Detailed information on the history of 851 Beech Avenue is contained in the following report.

Ownership

  • April 3. 1869
  • August 6, 1869
  • September 15, 1898
  • February 17, 1899
  • January 18, 1913
  • August 13, 1926
  • October 2, 1931
  • March 7, 1947
  • April 29, 1947
  • January 22, 1971
  • July 27, 2007

Elizabeth F. Denny of Pittsburgh conveyed the lot on which 851 Beech Avenue now stands to Alfred McDonald of Pittsburgh for $2,836. The property was located on the south side of Beech Avenue, 71’ from Galveston (then Grant) Avenue, and measured 35’2.75” wide along Beech Avenue by 137’4.5” deep to an unnamed 20’ wide alley (now Dounton Way). The property was known as the east part of Lot 33 and all of Lot 32 in Block 1 of the Plan of Lots land out by Elizabeth F. Denny.

The property was in the Second Ward of Allegheny City, which became part of Pittsburgh on December 9, 1907.

(Deed Book Volume 244, Page 155)

Alfred and Mary A. McDonald of Allegheny City conveyed 851 Beech Avenue to James J. Siebeneck of Pittsburgh for $9,000.

James J. Siebeneck, a childless widower, died while owning 851 Beech Avenue. He left a will, recorded in Allegheny County Will Book Volume 50, Page 289, but died intestate as to 851 Beech Avenue. He was survived by as his sole heirs three siblings, all widowed: Joseph G. Siebeneck, Catherine Schreher and Julie Ansbach.

Julia Alsbach of Mayence, Germany, conveyed her one third interest in 851 Beech Avenue to Frank G. Alsbach of Allegheny City in consideration of love and affection.

(DBV 1000 P 590)

Joseph G. Siebeneck of Allegheny City,
Frederick G. and Marietta Alsbach of Allegheny City, and Catherine Schreher of Mayence, Hessen Darmstadt, Germany, conveyed 851 Beech Avenue to Charles Holmes of Pittsburgh for $7,500.

(Deed Book 1016 P 493)

Charles Holmes of Pittsburgh conveyed 851 Beech Avenue to Ann Lattner Gerlach of Pittsburgh for $5,300.

(DBV 1757 P 509)

Ann Lattner Gerlach died on August 13, 1926. She left 851 Beech Avenue to her husband John Gerlach Jr. and to any of her children who would be living at the time of her death (WBV 199 P 596). The Gerlach children were Lawrence A., Crescentia, Marie, Anna, Claude and John E.

John Gerlach Jr. conveyed his interest in 851 Beech Avenue to his six children: Lawrence A. Gerlach of Flushing, New York, Crescentia Gerlach Shutrump of Cleveland and Marie E. Gerlach, Anna A. Gerlach, Claude J. Gerlach and John E. Gerlach of Pittsburgh for $1 and other considerations.

(DBV 2462 P 101)

Lawrence A. and Edna Gerlach of Middletown, Delaware, George and Crescentia Gerlach Shutrump and Chaude J. and Muriel Gerlach of Youngstown, Ohio, Robert and Marie Gerlach Jackson of Ligonier, Westmoreland County and William H. and Anna Gerlach Fuellenwarth of West View conveyed their 5/6 interest in 851 Beech Avenue to John E. Gerlach of Pittsburgh for $7,500.

(DBV 2939 P 395)

Title to 851 Beech Avenue was placed in the names of John E. and Lauretta H. Gerlach.

(DBV 2954 P 122)

Title to 851 Beech Avenue was placed in the name of Lauretta Henderson Gerlach.

Lauretta H. Bohonick, formerly Lauretta Henderson Gerlach, died on March 28, 2006.
(DBV 4513 P 710)

Catherine M. Serventi and Eugene T. Wilson purchased 851 Beech Avenue from the estate of Lauretta H. Bohonick, also known as Lauretta H. Gerlach or Lauretta Henderson Gerlach, on July 27, 2007.

(DBV 13328 P 422)

Age of the House

Construction

Local historical records indicate that Alfred McDonald constructed 851 Beech Avenue in 1869.

Alfred McDonald purchased the lot on which 851 Beech Avenue stands on April 3,1869. He paid $2,836 for the property, measuring 35’2.75” wide by 137’4.5” deep. This purchase, at 59 cents per square foot, was comparable to prices paid for other undeveloped lots in and near Allegheny West at the time.
McDonald and his wife, Mary A., sold the lot to James J. Siebeneck for $9,000 on August 6, 1869. The significant increase in property value indicates that a house had been built on the property after the April sale. The 1870 Pittsburgh directory listed James J. Siebeneck as living at 68 Beach Street (now 851 Beech Avenue) for the first time. The first plat map of the area, published in 1872, depicts the house.

Architectural Style

Alfred McDonald built 851 Beech Avenue in the Italianate style, which is shown in the house’s arched front door surround and window hoods, the rounded ornamental panels of the front door surround, and paired brackets below its box gutter and along the roofline on the east elevation. The Italianate style was the most popular architectural style in the Pittsburgh area between the late 1850s and the mid-1880s. In urban neighborhoods like Allegheny West, where high land costs encouraged construction of houses of about 25’ or less in width, Italianate house exteriors were characterized primarily by side-gabled roofs, arched door and window openings, prominent or projecting door and window hoods, and decorative brackets.
Interior details of Italianate houses often included flared newel posts and spindles, marble or wood mantels with arched openings, four-panel doors with porcelain knobs and ornamented cast iron hinges and non-symmetrical door and window trim. In the Pittsburgh area, many Italianate houses were built with stairways that incorporated landings located about three steps below the main level of the second floor. Most local Italianate houses also featured two-over-two double-hung windows, although some later or larger examples were constructed with one-over-one double-hung windows.

The Developer: Alfred McDonald

Alfred McDonald was a bricklaying contractor in Allegheny City and Pittsburgh in the 1860s and 1870s. He moved from Arthur Street in the lower Hill District in Pittsburgh to Beech Avenue in Allegheny in 1866-1867, when he constructed a house at 853 Beech Avenue for himself and his family. The McDonald family lived at 853 Beech Avenue until 1869 or 1870, and later lived at various addresses on the Mexican War Streets and in Manchester.

Street Name and Numbering

The house at 851 Beech Avenue was originally known as 68 Beach or Beech Street. The street became known as Beech Avenue in 1892-1893. The house became 851 Beech Avenue when the North Side’s modern street numbering system was put in place in 1899.

Garage Construction

Plat maps of the area around 851 Beech Avenue published in and before 1910 show that the large garage at the rear of the property had not been built. City of Pittsburgh building permit dockets show that in October 1913, Ann Gerlach received a permit for the construction of a brick garage at the rear of 851 Beech Avenue. The garage was to measure 35’ wide by 56’ deep, and have a slate roof. Its estimated construction cost was $3,130.
The name of the contractor who was to construct the garage is illegible in hand-written building permit records.

A 1925 fire insurance map shows that the garage had been built.

The Home Today

Photos by Chris Siewers

Through the Years


Residents

The Siebenecks

Pittsburgh directories, U.S. census records, an obituary, information compiled on ancestry.com, and other sources provide information on James J. and Margaret Siebeneck, the first owners of 851 Beech Avenue.

Learn More

The Holmeses

Records of the 1900 census list Charles Holmes, 64, and Sallie Holmes, 56, as the only residents of 851 Beech Avenue. Census records also show that 851 Beech Avenue was not mortgaged.

Learn More


The Gerlachs

Ann Gerlach bought 851 Beech Avenue in 1913, and records of the next three population censuses provide information on her family.

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Supplementary Materials

The following materials accompany this report:

Maps

  • a copy of part of an 1852 map depicting Allegheny City
  • a copy of part of an 1872 plat map of the area around 851 Beech Avenue
  • copies of parts of fire insurance maps of the area around 851 Beech Avenue, published in 1884, 1893, 1906 and 1925 and the 1925 map, updated by the publisher to 1950

Siebeneck

  • the marriage notice of James J. Siebeneck and Margaret McKinney, from the Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette, October 20, 1859
  • a copy of James J. Siebeneck’s passport application, April 21, 1873
  • the obituary of Margaret E. Siebeneck, from the Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette, October 1, 1877
  • information on James J. Siebeneck, from The Twentieth Century Bench and Bar of Pennsylvania (1903)
  • the obituary of James J. Siebeneck, from the Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette, March 21, 1896
  • letter from James J. Siebeneck (and others) to President Elect Lincoln, January 13, 1861

Holmes

  • the marriage notice of Charles Holmes and Sallie A. Mastisson, from the Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette, July 5, 1879
  • portraits of Charles Holmes and other officers of the Mortgage Banking Company, from Views of Pittsburgh (1903)
  • the obituary of Sallie Holmes, from the Pittsburgh Gazette Times, July 13, 1911
  • the obituary of Charles Holmes, from the Pittsburgh Gazette Times, July 24, 1916

A Researched History
By: Carol J. Peterson

all photos by Chris Siewers, unless otherwise noted

Last Call: Tickets for A Tour & Tasting in Old Allegheny on June 5 & 6

Lillies

We wanted to make sure folks who signed up for notifications had one last reminder to purchase tickets for the tour before the write-up about the tour runs in the Post-Gazette this weekend. There are only a few places left for Friday. Saturday afternoon has the most openings if you’re hoping to bring a larger group. There will be no tickets available at the door; advanced purchase required.

It’s a house and garden tour.

Guests will visit some of the most lavishly decorated homes and gardens in the Pittsburgh area. Learn about French architectural and literary influences in the neighborhood.

It’s a wine tasting – featuring wine from France.

Guests will sample a variety of regional reds and whites from France, one at each stop on the tour, and hors d’oeuvres to accompany them.

Dates & Times

Friday, June 5

5:00 – 9:00 pm

Saturday, June 6

12:30 – 4:30 pm or 5:00 – 9:00 pm

Free Parking

We have made arrangements for free parking for people with tickets attending the tour.

Learn More

Questions? Contact Us Getting Here Buy Tickets →