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806 Western Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15233

The Prices

William P. Price was born in what later became the Allegheny Center Mall area in October 1845. He was one of at least seven children of Henry T. and Mary Price, both born in Pennsylvania. By 1858, the Price family lived on Sherman Avenue near Sampsonia Street. At the time, Henry T. Price was a carpenter with a shop at Water and Middle Streets in Allegheny.

In about 1862 the Price family moved to Chateau Street in Manchester, then an independent borough bordering Allegheny City. Around that time, William P. Price began working as a carpenter with his father.

In 1865 Henry T. and William P. Price formed a partnership, Henry T. Price & Company, oil tank builders, at 165 Lacock Street. The Price family moved to 1231 Monterey Street the following year. William P. Price went into business as a real estate and insurance agent at 33 Ohio Street in 1867, and moved the business to 21 Diamond Street by 1870. Later in 1870, William P. Price closed his office and joined his father in Price, Stewart & Company, agricultural implement dealers, at 32-34 Ohio Street.

Records of the 1870 census show that William P. Price, 25, lived with his parents and younger brothers and sisters on Monterey Street. Price’s siblings were James, 21, a clerk in a boat store, John, 19, a salesman in a store, and Mary, 17, Ella, 14, Charles, 13, and Frank, ten, all attending school. In 1870, William P. Price owned no real estate and had no personal estate. Henry T. Price owned no real estate and had a personal estate of $3000.

In 1872, at 26, William P. Price married Margaret McClintock Whitesell, 22, of Carrington Street in Allegheny City. She was born in Allegheny City on February 4, 1850, and was a daughter of Catherine McClintock Whitesell and the late Dr. George L. Whitesell. William P. and Margaret Price began living at 1214 Arch Street.

William P. Price was elected to Allegheny City Council for the first time in 1873. Serving on the councils of Allegheny or Pittsburgh was then a part-time endeavor, and Price continued as a partner in Price, Stewart & Company. He eventually served as Allegheny City Council president.

The Prices moved to 1528 Arch Street by 1877. The 1880 census enumerated William P. and Margaret Price at 1528 Arch Street with their children George L.W., five, and Henry T., three, and Margaret Price’s mother Catherine Whitesell, who was 50.

The Price family lived at 1528 Arch Street until they moved to 908 Beech Avenue in 1886. At about that time, William P. Price left the agricultural implements business that he had worked in with his father and became a manufacturer’s agent. Price had an office Downtown at 43 Sixth Avenue in the late 1880s, at 943 Liberty Avenue in 1890, and at 17 Seventh Avenue in 1892.

Records of the 1890 census, which would provide information on residents of 908 Beech Avenue in that year, were destroyed in a warehouse fire in Washington D.C. in the 1920s.

William P. Price changed careers again by 1893, when he opened a sewer pipe and builders supplies business at 302 Wood Street in Pittsburgh. Price continued in this work until about 1895, when he and his son George L.W. Price went into business as electrical contractors.

At the time of the 1900 census, William P. and Margaret Price had had five children, all of whom were still living at home at 908 Beech Avenue. George L.W. Price, 25, was an electrician, Henry T., 23, was a physician, and Ella, 19, John M., 17, and Catherine, 14, attended school. An adopted daughter, Nancy J. Stinson, 26, also lived at 908 Beech Avenue. Stinson was an unmarried schoolteacher who had been born in Pennsylvania to Scotch-Irish parents. Margaret Price’s widowed mother Catherine Whitesell, 70, also lived at 908 Beech Avenue in 1900.

William P. Price died on October 25,1904, when he was struck by a train at the North Avenue and Brighton Road crossing near his home. The crossing was then at-grade, a few years before the tracks were lowered through and northwest of West Park. During the first decade of the 20th century, numerous fatalities at at-grade railroad crossings throughout the United States led to the lowering or shifting of railroad lines in the interest of public safety. It is likely that the death of a well-known citizen such as William P. Price contributed to the decision to lower the tracks through West Park.

In 1910, according to census records, Margaret Price lived at 908 Beech Avenue with other family members, a lodger, and a servant. Nancy Stinson, 36, was a schoolteacher, as was Ella Price, 28. John Price, 26, was an electrical supplies dealer, and Catherine Price, 23, was a self-employed music teacher. Frederick A. Riegel, 28, an unmarried electrical supplies salesman, was the Prices’ lodger. He had been born in Pennsylvania. The family’s servant was Margaret O’Brien, 20, who had born in Pennsylvania to parents born in England.

Pittsburgh city directories show that Margaret Price moved out of the city of Pittsburgh in 1911 or 1912. After leaving 908 Beech Avenue, Price converted the house to a four-family dwelling. She lived at 6911 Prospect Avenue in Ben Avon, which she owned, with her daughter Ella and Nancy Stinson before she died on February 7,1934.

The Sterritts

John Sterritt was born in Virginia to foreign-born parents in about 1802. His wife Jane Stewart Sterritt was born in Ireland in about 1815. By 1850, John and Jane Sterritt were married and living in Allegheny City, where John Sterritt operated a dry goods store on Federal Street. Records of the 1850 census show that John and Jane Sterritt had four children, and also shared their home with Jane Sterritt’s sister and two other persons. In 1850, the Sterritts’ children were James S., ten, and William H., six, both attending school, and Robert, three, and Jane M., one. Jane Sterritt’s sister was Rachel Stewart, 29, who had no occupation. Also living with the family in 1850 were Jane Longhay, 13, born in Ireland, and James Vanweller, 20. Jane Longhay’s relation to the Sterritt family is unknown. James Vanweller was a salesman who boarded with the family.

The Sterritt family belonged to the First United Presbyterian Church of Allegheny for many years, including during the time that they lived at 908 Beech Avenue. The church was located on Union Avenue in what later became the Allegheny Center Mall area.

By 1856, the Sterritt family lived at the northeast corner of the North Commons (now North Avenue) and Federal Street. In the late 1850s, John Sterritt closed or sold his dry goods store and became a property assessor. Within a few years, Sterritt was a real estate agent and rent collector with an office at 70 Diamond Street in Allegheny. Sterritt’s sons William and Robert began working with him as clerks in the late 1860s.

The Sterritt family lived at North Avenue and Federal Street until 1868, when the city directory listed John Sterritt as living on Beech Avenue near Grant Avenue (now Galveston Avenue). Sterritt was listed at 53 (908) Beech Avenue beginning in 1870.

Records of the 1870 census show that John and Jane Sterritt lived at 908 Beech Avenue with two of their sons, Jane Sterritt’s sister Rachel Stewart, and a servant. William Sterritt, 25, was reported to be a bookkeeper, and Robert Sterritt, 21, was a salesman. Rachel Stewart, 49, had no occupation. The Sterritts’ servant was Amanda Hopkins, 18, who had been born in Pennsylvania.

The 1870 census, the last census to provide information on assets of persons enumerated, reported that John Sterritt owned real estate worth $25,000 and had a “personal estate” or cash savings of $1400. Jane Sterritt owned real estate worth $12,000 and had no personal estate. The Sterritts’ total assets of $38,400 were comparable to around $1.2 million or more in the early 21st century.

John Sterritt’s real estate office moved to 40 North Diamond Street in the early 1870s. At around that time, William H. Sterritt became a notary public at the same address. John Sterritt worked as a real estate agent until he died in late September or early October 1876. After Sterritt’s death, Jane Sterritt and other family members continued to live at 908 Beech Avenue.

The 1880 manuscript census listed William H. Sterritt as the head of the household at 908 Beech Avenue. Sterritt had married by that time, and he and his wife Jennie had a son, John C., five. Jennie Sterritt, 27, had been born in Pennsylvania and was of Irish descent. Jane Sterritt, 63, and Rachel Stewart, 59, still lived at 908 Beech Avenue in 1880.

In the early 1880s William Sterritt was a partner in Sterritt & Algeo, real estate agents, at 49 North Diamond Street. Sterritt’s partner was W.W. Algeo of Armandale Street in Allegheny City.

In 1885, Jane Sterritt prepared to sell 908 Beech Avenue. A December 8, 1885 advertisement in the Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette informed the public:

FOR SALE – 53 BEECH ST., NEAR GRANT ave, Allegheny. Ground 40 x 100 to alley; two-story brick house, 8 rooms, attics, laundry, bath, range, natural gas, stable. A good substantial residence. A. LEGGATE, Agent, 31 Federal St.

Jane Sterritt sold 908 Beech Avenue in 1886. She lived in the Pittsburgh area, possibly with her son William in Bellevue, until she died in 1893.

908 Beech Avenue

908 Beech Avenue

Introduction

Local historical records indicate that John and Jane Sterritt had 908 Beech Avenue built in or shortly before 1868. The Sterritts appear to have had the house built while its site was still owned by Elizabeth F. Denny, who subdivided land along Beech Avenue into building lots in the mid-1860s. They took title to the 4000 square foot lot in 1872, paying $2200.

The Sterritts had 908 Beech Avenue built in the Italianate style, which is shown in the house’s projecting front door surround with brackets and decorative panels, projecting window hoods, and paired brackets that are below the box gutter and within the east gable. The Italianate style was the most popular architectural style in the Pittsburgh area between approximately 1860 and 1885. Later owners William P. and Margaret Price were responsible for the construction of the two-story rear brick building at 908 Beech Avenue, built in 1895 for $600.

John Sterritt was a real estate agent in Allegheny City for many years. He was born in Virginia, and Jane Sterritt was born in Ireland. The Sterritts had at least two children, William and Robert, who lived at 908 Beech Avenue. Rachel Stewart, an unmarried sister of Jane Sterritt, and a servant, Amanda Hopkins, also lived in the house. John Sterritt died in 1876, and Jane Sterritt sold 908 Beech Avenue for $8500 in 1886.

William P. and Margaret McC. Price were the second owners of 908 Beech Avenue. William P. Price was a real estate agent and partner in an agricultural implement business before he lived at 908 Beech Avenue, and a manufacturers’ agent, builders’ supplies business owner, and electrical contractor while he lived in the house. He also served on Allegheny City Council, eventually becoming council president. Price lived at 908 Beech Avenue until 1904, when he was struck and killed by a train at West North Avenue and Brighton Road, then an at-grade crossing.

Margaret McC. Price lived at 908 Beech Avenue for several years after she was widowed, then moved to Ben Avon and converted her former home to apartments. She sold the house for $10,000 in 1923. The next owners, members of the Byrnes family, lived at 908 Beech Avenue and shared their home with roomers and tenants.

The former Sterritt house at 908 Beech Avenue has now had a total of 11 owners. Detailed information on the history of the house is contained in the following report.

Ownership

Elizabeth F. Denny became the owner of property that included the 900 block of Beech Avenue through inheritance in the mid-19th century. In the mid-1860s, Denny subdivided property along Beech Avenue into building lots.

  • June 13, 1872
  • February 1, 1873
  • March 1, 1873
  • March 1, 1886
  • September 7, 1923
  • September 16, 1931
  • September 21, 1944
  • August 28, 1961
  • September 30, 1969
  • May 26, 1977
  • August 8, 1980
  • February 27, 1917
  • January 30, 2017

Elizabeth F. Denny of Pittsburgh conveyed the lot at 908 Beech Avenue to John Sterritt of Allegheny City for $2200. The house occupied the lot on which it now stands, measuring 40′ wide along the north side of Beech Avenue by 100′ deep to Butter Cup Alley (now Buttercup Way). The lot was known as Lots 27 and 28 in Block 4 in a plan of lots laid out by Elizabeth F. Denny in the Second Ward of Allegheny City. The lot was part of a larger tract of land known as Out Lot 267 in the Reserve Tract opposite Pittsburgh.

(Deed Book Volume 292, Page 176)

John and Jane Sterritt of Allegheny City conveyed 908 Beech Avenue to Robert B. Sterritt of Allegheny City for $10,000.

(DBV 304 P 283)

Robert B. Sterritt of Allegheny City conveyed 908 Beech Avenue to Jane Sterritt of Allegheny City for $12,000.

(DBV 304 P 287)

Jane Sterritt, widow, of Allegheny City conveyed 908 Beech Avenue to Margaret McC. Price of Allegheny City for $8500.

(DBV 526 P 324)

Margaret McC. Price, widow, of Ben Avon, conveyed 908 Beech Avenue to Margaret Byrnes of Pittsburgh for $10,000.

Margaret Byrnes died on July 2, 1931.

(DBV 2163 P 669)

Martin C. Mihm, executor of the estate of Margaret Byrnes of Pittsburgh, conveyed 908 Beech Avenue to Anne Byrnes of Pittsburgh for $8000.

(DBV 2463 P 646)

Anne Byrnes, widow, of Pittsburgh, conveyed 908 Beech Avenue to Mabel M. Jiles and Hazel P. Jiles, both unmarried, of Pittsburgh, for $1 and other considerations.

Mabel M. Jiles died on January 24, 1957. She was survived by Hazel P. Jiles, who died on October 11, 1959.

(DBV 2823 P 105)

Ralph H. Smith Jr., executor of the estate of Hazel P. Jiles of Bellevue, conveyed 908 Beech Avenue to Donald R. and Barbara B. Ruffner for $10,700.

(DBV 3982 P 584)

Donald R. and Barbara B. Ruffner of Allegheny County conveyed 908 Beech Avenue to King North Development Corporation for $11,750.

(DBV 4504 P 627)

King North Development Corporation conveyed 908 Beech Avenue to Herman D. and Kyle K. Tomer of Pittsburgh for $14,000.

(DBV 5780 P 833)

Herman D. and Kyle K. Tomer of Pitsburgh conveyed 908 Beech Avenue to Marc Morley Kane and Barbara Stewart Kane of Pittsburgh for $92,500.

(DBV 6284 P 5)

James W. and Ida Walton Scully of Pittsburgh conveyed 845 North Lincoln Avenue to James S. Childs of Pittsburgh for $1 and other considerations.

(DBV 1894 P 21)

Gregory M. Kobulnicky purchased 908 Beech Avenue from Marc Morley Kane and Barbara Stewart Kane on January 30, 2017.

(DBV 16686 P 324)

Age of the House

Historical records suggest that John and Jane Sterritt had 908 Beech Avenue built in or shortly before 1868.

The June 13,1872 sale of the lot on which 908 Beech Avenue stands for $2200, at 55 cents per square foot, is consistent with the lot being undeveloped. However, Pittsburgh city directories listed John Sterritt and his son William H. Sterritt at 53 Beech Street (now 908 Beech Avenue) beginning in 1870. In 1868 and 1869, before houses on Beech Avenue received numbers, directories listed John and William Sterritt as living on Beech Avenue near Grant Avenue (now Galveston Avenue).

An 1890 plat map shows that 908 Beech Avenue was known as 53 Beech Street. Most older North Side neighborhoods received their current street numbers in 1899.
John Sterritt’s occupation as an Allegheny City realtor suggests that Sterritt may have entered into an unrecorded agreement with Elizabeth F. Denny, from whom he bought the lot, enabling Sterritt to erect a house on the lot before he became the owner of the property. The price that Sterritt paid for the lot also supports that possibility. Allegheny County records show rising prices for undeveloped Beech Avenue lots between the late 1860s, when few homes had been built on the street, and 1872, when more than 20 houses had been built. The 55 cents per square foot that John Sterritt paid in 1872 was closer to the prices that Beech Avenue lot buyers paid in the late 1860s than in the early 1870s.

Architectural Style

John and Jane Sterritt had 908 Beech Avenue built in the Italianate style. The style is shown in the house’s projecting front door surround with brackets and decorative panels, in the facade’s projecting window hoods, and in the paired brackets that are below the box gutter and within the east gable.

Interior details of Italianate houses often included flared newel posts and spindles, marble or wood mantels with arched openings, four-panel doors with porcelain knobs and ornamented cast iron hinges, and non-symmetrical door and window trim. In the Pittsburgh area, many Italianate houses were built with stairways that incorporated landings located about three steps below the main level of the second floor. Most local Italianate houses also featured two-over-two double-hung windows, although some later or larger examples were constructed with one-over-one double-hung windows.
The Italianate style was the most popular architectural style for houses and commercial buildings constructed in the Pittsburgh area between about 1860 and 1885.Known records do not identify an architect who is credited with the design of 908 Beech Avenue, or a construction firm that built the house.

Rear Building

The two-story brick building at the rear of 908 Beech Avenue was constructed in 1895, with construction possibly extending into 1896. The building was apparently constructed for storage of electrical supplies.

Fire insurance maps published in 1884 and 1893 depict a two-story wood frame stable at the rear of the property at 908 Beech Avenue. Allegheny City government began to require building permits for new construction, additions, and alterations in 1894. Allegheny City building permit records show that on November 19,1895, Margaret McC. Price received a permit for the construction of what was described as a two-story brick storage building on Buttercup Alley. The building was to measure 15’ by 25’, and had an estimated construction cost of $600. George L.W. Price, a son of Margaret McC. Price, was to construct the building.
A 1901 plat map and a 1906 fire insurance map depict the brick building. The 1906 fire insurance map labelled the building as “electric shop.” Pittsburgh directories show that George L.W. Price and his father, William P. Price, became electrical contractors together in about 1895.

Street Name and Numbering

The house at 908 Beech Avenue was known as 53 Beech Avenue between about 1870 and 1899. It was renumbered 908 Beech Avenue in 1899, when Allegheny City government put in place the Northside’s modern street numbering system.

Residents

The Sterritts

Pittsburgh directories, U.S. census records, and other sources provide information on John and Jane Sterritt.

Learn More

The Prices

The second owners of 908 Beech Avenue were William P. Price, a native of Allegheny City, and his wife Margaret.

Learn More

The 1920 Census

Records of the 1920 census show that 908 Beech Avenue was rented to families headed by Glen Dean, David Ford, Henry Lutz, and Gerald Latshaw. A total of 14 people lived in the house.

Glen Dean, 39, was an auto repairman who had been born in Ohio. His wife Mary, 37, had been born in Pennsylvania. The couple had four children: Forrest, 14, Rowan, 13, Bessie, eight, and James, six.

David Ford was a 22-year-old box maker who had been born in New Jersey. His wife Maria had been born in New York. The Fords’ only child was Maria, 18 months.
Henry Lutz, 40, was a steel mill laborer. He and his wife Evelyn, 37, had both been born in Pennsylvania and had no children.

Gerald Latshaw, a native of Pennsylvania, was a 24-year-old chauffeur who worked for a private family. His wife Helen, 22, had been born in New York State. The couple had a five- year-old daughter, Germaine.

The 1930 Census

Records of the 1930 census list Margaret Byrnes as the head of the household at 908 Beech Avenue. Byrnes, 66, was a widow who had been born in Northern Ireland and arrived in the United States in 1888. Her occupation was listed as landlady of a rooming house. She had four children and six roomers who lived with her. Byrnes’ children who lived with her, all unmarried, were William, 30, a news dealer at a newsstand, Paul, 28, a detective with a detective agency, Anne, 26, with no occupation, and Regis, 23, with no occupation.
The roomers who lived at 908 Beech Avenue in 1930 were:

  • Charles Anderson, 45, a steel mill laborer
  • Joanna Anderson, 45, with no occupation; Charles Anderson’s wife
  • William Lang, 40, a laborer in a pressed steel works
  • Grace Lang, 40, with no occupation; William Lang’s wife
  • Charles Brown, 28, a cabdriver
  • Mary Brown, 25, with no occupation; Charles Brown’s wife

All of the roomers living at 908 Beech Avenue in 1930 were at least second-generation natives of Pennsylvania.

The 1940 Census

In 1940, according to census records, Thomas and Ann Byrnes owned and lived at 908 Beech Avenue. Thomas Byrnes, 40, had been born in Ireland, was a high school graduate, and was employed as a street foreman with the city Bureau of Highways. He had worked 48 hours in the week before the census. In 1939, he had worked seven weeks and earned $245. His wife, Ann, 38, was also a high school graduate, and did not work outside the home. She had been born in Pennsylvania. They had three children: Thomas Jr., six, Ann, four, and Charles, one.

Thomas and Ann Byrnes rented apartments at 908 Beech Avenue to Earl and Hilda Brant, Angelo Festi, Norman and Elizabeth Currie, and George W. Richardson.

The Brants rented their apartment for $27 per month. Earl Brant, 21, was a dispatcher with a motor freight company. He was a Pennsylvania native who had completed three years of high school. In the week before the census he had worked 48 hours, and in 1939 he had worked 52 weeks and earned $1500. Hilda Brant, 56, was listed, probably incorrectly, as Earl’s wife. She had been born in Pennsylvania, was a high school graduate, and had no occupation.

Angelo Festi, 46, rented for $18 per month. He had been born in South America, had an eighth grade education, and worked in building construction. In 1939, he had worked 22 weeks and earned $1040. He was married, but was living apart from his wife. He shared his apartment with his son, Vincent, who was 19 years old. Vincent Festi had been born in Italy and had an eighth grade education. He was employed as a candy maker in a candy factory. He had worked 40 hours in the week before the census, and in 1939 he had worked 38 weeks and earned $646.
Norman and Elizabeth Currie, both natives of Scotland, paid $26 monthly rent. Norman Currie, 45, was a high school graduate and an instructor at a golf club. He had worked 48 hours in the week before the census, and in 1939 he had worked 32 weeks and earned $960. Elizabeth Currie, 40, had completed the eighth grade and did not work outside the home. The couple had two children: Helen, five, and Mary Elizabeth, three.

George W. Richardson rented for $12 per month. He was 81 years old and a widower with an eighth grade education. He had been born in Pennsylvania, and was retired. He had income other than from salary or wages.
In 1940,908 Beech Avenue had an estimated value of $1500. The house’s value was estimated at $8000 in 1930, before the Great Depression affected property values throughout the Pittsburgh area and in other regions of the United States.

The 1940 census is the last census that provides information on occupants of 908 Beech Avenue. Manuscript census records are withheld from public view for 72 years, to protect the privacy of persons who were enumerated.

Supplementary Materials

The following materials accompany this report:


A Researched History
By: Carol J. Peterson

all photos by Nick Smerker, unless otherwise noted

The Joneses

Benjamin Franklin Jones was born in Claysville, Washington County, southwest of Pittsburgh, in 1824. He came to Pittsburgh at age 18, in 1842, and began working as a clerk for the Mechanics Line, which shipped freight between Pittsburgh and other eastern cities by river, canal and railroad. He entered the iron industry with his employer Samuel Kier in the 1840s, and in 1851 became a partner in Jones & Lauth, which operated the American Iron Works along the Monongahela River on what is now the South Side. The firm was succeeded by Jones & Laughlin less than a decade later, and expanded its works on the South Side while adding large new plants in Oakland, Hazelwood, and later Aliquippa, Beaver County. Jones & Laughlin eventually employed at least 20,000 workers with an annual output of hundreds of millions of tons of steel.

B.F. Jones

B.F. Jones (center) at The Duquesne Club

In 1850, Jones married Mary McMasters of Allegheny County. Elizabeth McMasters Jones was born in September 1863; the couple’s other children were Mary Franklin, born in 1851, Eva K. (1859-61), Alice B., born in 1867, and Benjamin F. Jr., born in 1868. The family lived in a large house on the 900 block of Penn Avenue, Downtown, in the 1850s and 1860s. In 1870, they moved to a new mansard-roofed mansion on Brighton Road at North Lincoln Avenue in Allegheny West. Members of the Jones family lived there into the twentieth century, and constructed several other Allegheny West houses as well. The mansion at Brighton and North Lincoln may have been the biggest house in Allegheny West when it was built, although a few later mansions in the neighborhood, including at least three built by Jones descendants, were larger.

Elizabeth M. Jones married Joseph Otto Horne of Bidwell Street south of West North Avenue in Manchester on February 28, 1884. Joseph O. Horne was born in Pittsburgh in 1860. He was a son of Joseph Horne, the founder and proprietor of the Pittsburgh department store that bore his name for well over a century, and worked for the family business in the 1880s.

Mrs Horne

Elizabeth McMasters Jones Horne’s portrait at the B.F. Jones Library in Aliquippa

For the first five years after they married, Joseph O. and Elizabeth M. Horne lived in the Jones mansion on Brighton Road. They moved into the new house at 838 North Lincoln Avenue in time for Joseph O. Horne to be listed there in the Pittsburgh directory published in that year. The Hornes were then childless, but had three children in the 1890s: Madelaine in 1893, Elizabeth in 1895, and, Franklin Jones in 1899.

B.F. and Mary McMasters Jones’ other three children who reached adulthood occupied large Allegheny West houses after marrying. Mary Franklin Jones married Alex Laughlin Jr., a partner in Jones & Laughlins (the firm name then reflected the fact that more than one Laughlin was a partner), and they lived in a house that measured approximately 35’ wide by 70’ deep at the northwest corner of North Lincoln Avenue and Rope Way. After Alex Laughlin Jr. died in 1881, Mary F. Jones Laughlin moved back to her parents’ house and raised her children there.

Alice B. Jones married William W. Willock in 1889, and in 1893 the Willock family began living in what remains known as the Willock Mansion, commissioned by B.F. Jones at 705 Brighton Road. B.F. Jones Jr., a partner in Jones & Laughlin, and his family lived in a mansion next door to the Willocks at Brighton Road and Ridge Avenue for a decade or more before 1908, when they commissioned an even larger mansion that still stands on the site.

Joseph O. Horne left his family’s business in 1889 or 1890. He was elected to serve on Allegheny City Council, an unpaid position, around the same time, and remained in office for eight years. Pittsburgh directories did not list an occupation for him between 1890 and 1892. In 1893, Horne was corporate secretary of the National Safe Deposit and Vault Manufacturing Company on Third Avenue, Downtown. He was listed simply as a merchant living at 838 North Lincoln Avenue in Pittsburgh directories published in 1894 and 1895, and as living in the house and with no occupation between 1896 and 1900. He ran for Congress as a Republican in 1898, but lost the election.

Records of the 1890 census, which would provide information on occupants of 838 North Lincoln Avenue in that year, were destroyed in a warehouse fire in Washington D.C. in the 1920s. The handwritten 1900 census manuscript identified Elizabeth M. Horne, 36, as a divorced woman and as head of the family at 838 North Lincoln Avenue. Her children were Madelaine, six, Elizabeth, four, and Franklin, one. Elizabeth Horne then employed six servants who lived in her home. They were:

  • Sadie Cox, 18, a waitress who had been born in England and immigrated in 1887
  • Mary Meehan, 23, a chambermaid who had immigrated from Ireland in 1896
  • Agnes Cane, 26, a laundress who had been born in Pennsylvania to Irish immigrants; married but living separately from her husband
  • Kate McKennith, 23, a nurse who had immigrated from Ireland in 1880
  • Annie Hill, 19, a nurse born in Ireland; year of immigration unknown
  • Annie Steinholm, 26, a cook who had immigrated from Germany in 1895; living apart from her husband and two children

The Horne children attended Allegheny Preparatory School at the corner of North Lincoln and Galveston avenues. The school operated between 1898 and 1919 or 1920, with the majority of its students coming from Allegheny West and Manchester.

The 1900 and 1901 Pittsburgh directories listed Joseph O. Horne as a broker living at 838 North Lincoln Avenue; in 1902, Elizabeth M. Horne was listed as Joseph’s widow. Joseph O. Horne died from pneumonia on November 12, 1906.

Articles in the Pittsburgh Gazette Times and Pittsburgh Press reported that after Horne left his father’s business, “he gave up business life and spent most of his time in travel…for several years he had made California his home, but went to New York shortly after the earthquake.” The newspaper reports and an obituary in the society magazine The Bulletin did not mention Elizabeth M. Horne or the couple’s children.

Pittsburgh directories indicate that Elizabeth M. Horne and her children lived at 838 North Lincoln Avenue through 1906. After that time, the family lived full-time at their Sewickley Heights summer home, Ridgeview Farm. Elizabeth M. Horne owned 838 North Lincoln Avenue until 1916. She lived in Sewickley Heights until she died in 1939. After her death, newspapers reported that she had been worth $390,000. She is remembered in Aliquippa for having donated the construction cost of that community’s public library, the Benjamin Franklin Jones Memorial Library, which was built in 1927.

The Alexanders

Madelaine F. Laughlin Alexander and her husband, Rev. Maitland Alexander, lived at 838 North Lincoln Avenue between 1907 and 1910. Madelaine F. Laughlin Alexander was a daughter of Mary Franklin Jones Laughlin, first child of B.F. and Mary McMasters Jones, and Alex Laughlin Jr. Maitland Alexander was the pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh between 1899 and 1929.

The 1910 census enumerated the Alexander family at 838 North Lincoln Avenue. Maitland and Madelaine Alexander had been married for four years and had one child, Maitland Jr., who was 23 months old. The couple employed six servants who lived in the house:

  • Margaret Cleary, 31, a chambermaid, a widow who had been born in Pennsylvania to Irish immigrant parents
  • Anna Fitzpatric, 27, a nurse, she was a widow who had immigrated from England in 1895
  • Katharine McGonigle, 39, an unmarried cook who had immigrated from Ireland in 1899
  • Marguerite Steen, 21, a waitress, born in Pennsylvania and unmarried
  • Bridget Gagin, 38, a laundress who had immigrated from Ireland in 1898, unmarried
  • Hulda Richter, 29, a ladies’ maid who was unmarried and had immigrated from Germany in 1907

In about 1911, the Alexander family moved into one of the largest houses ever built on the Northside, a mansion at 920 Ridge Avenue. At around the same time, Madelaine Alexander’s sister, Mary McMasters Laughlin Robinson, her husband William C. Robinson, and their children moved into a mansion of similar size next door at 900 Ridge Avenue, at the corner of Galveston Avenue.

Mary Franklin Jones Laughlin had made the construction of the mansions possible in 1909, when she purchased the Pittsburgh and Allegheny Orphan Asylum at that site, demolished the building, and gave the property to her daughters. The Alexander and Robinson houses, alone with the adjacent William Penn Snyder house across Galveston Avenue, were the last mansions constructed in Allegheny West. The Alexander and Robinson mansions were demolished between 1938 and 1940.

The Darlingtons (Henry)

Henry Buckingham Darlington and his wife, Constance Alden Darlington, rented 838 North Lincoln Avenue from Elizabeth M. Horne between 1912 and 1915. Henry B. Darlington was an Indianapolis native and 1.906 Princeton University graduate, and a grandson of Harry Darlington of 721 Brighton Road. Constance Alden Darlington was a daughter of the architect Frank Alden.

Pittsburgh directories published in the early 1910s listed Henry Darlington as a clerk. In 1910, he worked for the Union Spring & Manufacturing Company, which had its office in room 617 of the Farmers Bank Building at Fifth Avenue and Wood Street, Downtown. He and Constance Darlington lived at 815 Western Avenue before they moved to 838 North Lincoln Avenue. In late 1913 or early 1914, Darlington was among the incorporators of the Standard Steel Spring Company. He became secretary-treasurer of the company, which operated a mill in Coraopolis. The couple married in 1910 and had one child, Henry B, Jr.

Henry B. Darlington died at home at 838 North Lincoln Avenue on November 14,1915, as a result of a bullet wound to the head. A revolver was found near Darlington, whose death was ruled a suicide. He was 32 years old.

Constance Alden Darlington and her son Henry Jr. left Pittsburgh in 1915 or early 1916.

946 Western Avenue

946 Western Avenue (Front)

Introduction

946 Western Avenue is a three story brick house occupying a 30′ wide by 120′ deep lot located in the Allegheny West section of Pittsburgh.

946 Western Avenue was built between 1875 and 1877 by Francis Torrance, president of the Standard Manufacturing Company. Torrance, a native of Ireland, had previously served for many years as manager of the Schenley Estate. Torrance lived at 946 Western Avenue until his death in 1886.

Francis Torrance’s son Francis J. Torrance, who also worked for the Standard Manufacturing Company, lived with his family at 946 Western Avenue through 1918.

946 Western Avenue was known as Torrance House-Home for Blind Women between 1928 and the early 1960’s.

946 Western Avenue was originally known as 86 Western Avenue.

Detailed information on the ownership history, age and first owner of 946 Western Avenue follows.

Ownership

  • May 18, 1875
  • December 22, 1928
  • November 15, 1962
  • August 6, 1975
  • October 24, 1977
  • October 3, 1990
  • April 16, 1992

Elizabeth F. Denny of the city of Pittsburgh to Francis Torrance of the city of Allegheny, $6,250. This deed and subsequent deeds conveyed a 30′ wide by 120′ deep lot located on the northern side of Western Avenue, 76′ east of Allegheny Avenue, in the Second Ward of the city of Allegheny. The lot was known as Lot 4 in Block 2 in a plan of lots laid out by Mrs. Elizabeth F. Denny. The lot was part of a larger tract of land situated in the Reserve Tract opposite Pittsburgh.

James O’Hara had left the property to his daughter Elizabeth Denny in his last will and testament, recorded in Will Book Volume 2, Page 101.

(Deed Book Volume 341, Page 37)

Mary R.D. Torrance, widow, of Glen Osborne, to William D. George of Sewickley, Horace Baker of Glen Osborne, and George E. Alter of Springdale, trustees, $1. This deed established a trust for the establishment and maintenance of 946 Western Avenue as Torrance House-Home for Blind Women.

(DBV 2370 P 376)

Francis J. Torrance Baker and Louis Willard Jr., successor-trustees, of the city of Pittsburgh, to Joseph T. and Hermine L. Hudon of the city of Pittsburgh, $15,000.

(DBV 4031 P 465)

Hermine L. Hudon, widow, of the city of Pittsburgh, to Ronald P. Wosher, Clifford B. Schultz Jr., William W. Lang and Kenneth R. Rader of Allegheny County, $24,000.

(DBV 5513 P 131)

Ronald P. and Linda Wosher, Clifford B. Schultz Jr., William W. Lang, and Kenneth R. Rader to Robert W. and Marlies B. Kiser, Irwin W. and Barbara H. Templeton, as joint tenants, $54,000.

(DBV 5857 P 587)

Robert W. and Marlies B. Kiser and Irwin W. and Barbara H. Templeton of the 22nd Ward of Pittsburgh to Harold R. and Elizabeth Keeler of the 22nd Ward of Pittsburgh, $40,000.

(DBV 8349 P 629)

Harold R. and Elizabeth Keeler to Allegheny City Restoration, a corporation, $46,000.

(DBV 8697 P 187)

Age of the House

Available information indicates that Francis Torrance and his wife Jane had 946 Western Avenue built between 1875 and 1877.

An 1872 plat map of the Allegheny West area shows that the lot on which 946 Western Avenue stands was undeveloped. The May 1875 sale of the lot on for $6250, at $1.74 per square foot, was comparable to sales of other lots in the area at the time and indicates that 946 Western Avenue had not yet been built.
Subsequently, the 1877 Pittsburgh city directory listed Francis Torrance as living on Western Avenue near Allegheny Avenue for the first time.

An 1882 plat map of the area indicated that 946 Western Avenue had been built.

Allegheny County mortgage records contain no record of any loan taken to finance construction of 946 Western Avenue.

Residents

The Torrances

Pittsburgh city directories, U.S. census records, and biographical materials provide information on Francis and Jane Torrance, the first owners of 946 Western Avenue.

Learn More

Supplementary Materials


A Researched History
By: Carol J. Peterson

all photos by Chris Siewers, unless otherwise noted

838 N Lincoln Avenue

838 N Lincoln Avenue (Front)

Introduction

Pittsburgh iron and steel manufacturer B.F. Jones and his wife, Mary McMasters Jones, had 838 North Lincoln Avenue built in 1889. They had the house constructed for their daughter, Elizabeth Jones Horne, and her husband, Joseph O. Horne. The house was designed by the firm of Longfellow, Alden & Harlow, whose partners had recently worked for H.H. Richardson and McKim, Mead & White. In addition to the cost of building 838 North Lincoln Avenue, B.F. Jones spent $15,250 to purchase the property and an additional amount to demolish an earlier dwelling and carriage house on the site.

Elizabeth Jones Horne and her family lived at 838 North Lincoln Avenue between 1889 and 1906. Her husband, Joseph O. Horne was a son of the Pittsburgh department store owner and a member of Allegheny City Council in the 1890s. The Hornes were divorced in the late 1890s. Elizabeth and her three children moved from North Lincoln Avenue to the family’s summer home in Sewickley Heights in 1906.

All four of B.F. Jones’ adult children resided in Allegheny West in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and some of Jones’ grandchildren made their homes there as well. After Elizabeth Horne left 838 North Lincoln Avenue, she rented the house to Madelaine F. Laughlin Alexander, a niece, and her husband Maitland Alexander, the pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Pittsburgh. The Alexanders lived at 838 North Lincoln Avenue for approximately four years before they moved into a new mansion that they commissioned at 920 Ridge Avenue. Records of the 1910 census show that the Alexander family had six servants who lived in the house- the same number of household staff that the Horne family had employed in 1900.

Henry B. and Constance Alden Darlington rented 838 North Lincoln Avenue between 1912 and 1915. Henry Darlington was a grandson of Harry Darlington of Brighton Road, and helped establish a spring manufacturing company while living in the house. Constance Alden Darlington was a daughter of Frank Alden of Longfellow, Alden & Harlow. Henry Darlington died at home in 1915, from a self-inflicted bullet wound. Constance Darlington and her son, Henry Darlington Jr., left Pittsburgh within a short time, and Elizabeth Horne sold the house in 1916.

The former Horne house at 838 North Lincoln Avenue has now had a total of 12 owners. Detailed information on the history of the house is contained in the following report.

Ownership

  • March 17, 1790
  • November 2, 1813
  • March 9, 1816
  • October 14, 1860
  • March 12, 1881
  • March 14, 1881
  • February 20, 1888
  • May 29, 1894
  • April 8, 1916
  • April 18, 1916
  • May 5, 1916
  • December 2, 1920
  • January 27, 1921
  • April 30, 1924
  • October 2, 1947
  • October 29, 1990
  • July 1, 1991

Charles Wilkins, merchant, of the town of Pittsburgh conveyed property that included the site of 838 North Lincoln Avenue to John Irwin, esquire, of the town of Pittsburgh for £30. This deed conveyed Out Lot 276 in the Reserve Tract Opposite Pittsburgh and Lot 69 in the town of Allegheny. Out Lot 276 was a ten-acre tract of land situated on the western side of land laid out for a common, and bounded by what are now Brighton Road and Ridge, Galveston, and Western avenues. Lot 69 in the town of Allegheny was a 60’ wide by 240’ deep lot at the corner of East Ohio and Sandusky streets.

John Irwin died intestate. He was survived by his widow, Mary, and four children: Margaret, John, William F., and Elizabeth.

(Deed Book Volume 2, Page 97)

William F. Irwin of the borough of Pittsburgh, one of the sons and heirs of John Irwin, rope maker, conveyed property that included the present site of 845 North Lincoln Avenue to John Irwin of the borough of Pittsburgh, another of the sons and heirs of John Irwin, for $1,772.

(DBV 19 P 127)

John and Hannah Irwin of the town of Allegheny conveyed property that included the present site of 845 North Lincoln Avenue to Elizabeth Irwin and Margaret Irwin of the town of Allegheny. This deed conveyed Out Lot 276 in the Reserve Tract and other property in the borough of Pittsburgh. This deed was an amicable partition of the estate of John Irwin.

(DBV 22 P 189)

John and Abigail Irwin of Allegheny City conveyed the lot on which 838 North Lincoln Avenue stands to Mrs. Ann Reed of Allegheny City for $450. The lot measured 24’ wide along North Lincoln Avenue (then Central Street) by 140’9-5/8” deep to Maolis Way (then an un-named alley), and was known as Lot 52 in a plan of lots laid out by John Irwin (Allegheny County Plan Book 2, Volume 173).

(DBV 151 P 47)

Allegheny County Sheriff Thomas H. Hunter conveyed the lot on which 838 North Lincoln Avenue stands to Archibald McBride. The deed stated that the property contained a two-story brick house and a stable.

(DBV 409 P 586)

Archibald and Fannie McBride of Pittsburgh conveyed the lot on which 838 North Lincoln Avenue stands to William Farley of Allegheny City for $6775.

(DBV 409 P 588)

William T. and Fannie L. Farley of Allegheny City conveyed the lot on which 838 North Lincoln Avenue stands to Benjamin F. Jones of Allegheny City for $15,250.

(DBV 602 P 32)

Benjamin F. and Mary McM. Jones of Allegheny City conveyed 838 North Lincoln Avenue to Elizabeth M. Horne of Allegheny City, their daughter, for $1. The house occupied Lot 52 in the John Irwin Plan.

(DBV 883 P 1)

Elizabeth M. Horne of Sewickley Heights conveyed 838 and 840 North Lincoln Avenue to Richard E. McClure of Pittsburgh for $1 and other considerations.

(DBV 1850 P 412)

Richard E. McClure of Pittsburgh conveyed 838 and 840 North Lincoln Avenue to Thomas H. Hasson of Pittsburgh for $1 and other considerations.

(DBV 1850 P 411)

Thomas H. and Amelia S. Hasson of Pittsburgh conveyed 838 North Lincoln Avenue to Thomas G. Hill of Pittsburgh for $10,000.

(DBV 1849 P 272)

Thomas G. Hill of Pittsburgh conveyed 838 North Lincoln Avenue to Alexander M. Patterson of Pittsburgh for $1 and other considerations (tax stamps suggest a price of $13,000).

(DBV 2109 P 354)

Alexander M. Patterson conveyed 838 North Lincoln Avenue to Edward E. and Zillah G. Wright for $1 and other considerations (tax stamps suggest a price of $4000).

(DBV 2037 P 490)

Edward E. and Zillah G. Wright of Pittsburgh conveyed 838 North Lincoln Avenue to Abraham H. and Gertrude L. McFerren of Pittsburgh for $18,000.

Abraham H. McFerren died on October 23, 1935. Full title to 838 North Lincoln Avenue was then vested in Gertrude L. McFerren, who died while owning the house.

(DBV 2181 P 586)

Mellon National Bank and Trust Company and Fred C. Houston, executors of the will of Gertrude Launtz Hopkins McFerren, conveyed 838 North Lincoln Avenue to William F. and Marion S. Thomas of Pittsburgh for $12,000.

William F. Thomas died on June 22,1958. His death vested full title to the house in Marion S. Thomas, who died on March 3,1981. Title to the house then passed to Philip W. Thomas.

(DBV 2977 P 83)

Philip W. Thomas conveyed 838 North Lincoln Avenue to Benard A. and Joedda McClain Sampson for $49,000.

(DBV 8363 P 274)

George R. Whitmer and Mariann E. Sonntag purchased 838 North Lincoln Avenue from Benard A. and Joedda McClain Sampson.

(DBV 8517 P 358)

Age of the House

Iron and steel manufacturer B.F. Jones and his wife, Mary McMasters Jones, had 838 North Lincoln Avenue constructed in 1889 for their daughter, Elizabeth Horne, and her family.

Plat maps published in 1872 and 1882 and an 1884 fire insurance map show that the present house at 838 North Lincoln Avenue had not been built, and that an earlier dwelling occupied its site. The 1884 map indicates that a two-story iron-clad carriage house, measuring approximately 25’ by 20’, stood at the rear of the property. B.F. Jones purchased the lot on which the house stands for $15,250 on February 20,1888. The amount that Jones paid indicates that the earlier house on the property was still standing.
The 1890 Pittsburgh city directory listed Joseph O. Horne, Elizabeth Jones Horne’s husband, at 69 Lincoln Avenue (now 838 North Lincoln Avenue) for the first time. An 1890 plat map and an 1893 insurance map show that the house that now stands on the lot had been built. The carriage house had been removed from the rear of the lot.

The book Architecture after Richardson: Regionalism before Modernism- Longfellow, Alden and Harlow in Boston and Pittsburgh (Margaret Henderson Floyd, 1994) identifies 838 North Lincoln Avenue as one of the Allegheny City houses that were designed by that prominent architectural firm, and reports that the house was constructed in 1889.

Architectural Style

The facade of 838 North Lincoln Avenue, particularly the first story, shows the influence of the Richardsonian Romanesque style in its rough-cut stone, rounded arches and the courses of the interconnected arches. The second story’s smooth masonry may reference the Richardsonian Romanesque style in its use of stone cladding and window opening placement, while also suggesting the designers’ wish to innovate rather than slavishly follow the style that Richardson had developed. The second story cladding, together with the egg-and-dart and dentil ornamentation and dormer elements, may also have foreshadowed the use of Classical Revival elements that became a more significant part of Longfellow, Alden & Harlow and its successor firm’s work in the 1890s.

The Architects

Longfellow, Alden & Harlow

The architectural firm of Longfellow, Alden & Harlow practiced in Pittsburgh and Boston between 1887 and 1896 (after Longfellow’s departure, Alden & Harlow continued into the 20th century). The firm was a partnership of Alexander Longfellow, Frank Alden, and Alfred Harlow. Longfellow and Alden had worked in the office of H.H. Richardson, who died in 1886. Harlow was a former employee of the New York firm of McKim, Mead & White. The three architects’ design skills and the reputations they had earned with their former firms enabled the firm to secure commissions to design some of the more important buildings that went up in Pittsburgh and Boston.

In Allegheny West, Longfellow, Alden & Harlow designed a number of dwellings that no longer stand, one of the largest and grandest of which was the Painter Mansion on Brighton Road immediately north of the B.F. Jones house. It is possible that the house, dubbed the “Allegheny Palace” by Pittsburgh newspapers, inspired B.F. Jones to employ the firm to design 838 North Lincoln Avenue for his daughter.
The firm’s work in and near the neighborhood that still stands includes the Pontefract Mansion on North Lincoln Avenue, the Rosenbach house at 836 Western Avenue, and the Boggs Mansion on West North Avenue. In Pittsburgh, Longfellow, Alden & Harlow’s work included the Main Branch of the Carnegie Institute and Library in Oakland, and the house known as Sunnyledge at Fifth and Wilkins avenues. Architecture after Richardson provides a thorough review of the work ofLongfellow Alden & Harlow and its successor firm, and its architectural and historical contexts.

Street Name and Numbering

North Lincoln Avenue was originally known as Central Street. The street was renamed Lincoln Avenue within about a year after President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated in 1865, and house numbers were assigned on the street in 1866 or 1867. The house at 838 North Lincoln was known as 69 Lincoln Avenue from the time that it was built until 1899, when the Northside’s modern street numbering system was put in place.

Lincoln Avenue became Lynndale Avenue in about 1909, when Pittsburgh city government changed a number of street names to eliminate duplication that resulted from Pittsburgh’s 1907 annexation of Allegheny City. The street was renamed North Lincoln Avenue in about 1913.

Residents

The Joneses

Pittsburgh directories, U.S. census records, biographical materials and other sources provide information on B.F. Jones, his daughter Elizabeth M. Horne, and other members of their family who were associated with 838 North Lincoln Avenue.

Learn More

The Alexanders

Madelaine F. Laughlin Alexander and her husband, Rev. Maitland Alexander, lived at 838 North Lincoln Avenue between 1907 and 1910.

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The Darlingtons

Henry Buckingham Darlington and his wife, Constance Alden Darlington, rented 838 North Lincoln Avenue from Elizabeth M. Horne between 1912 and 1915.

Learn More


The 1920 Census

The 1920 census enumerated occupants of two apartments at 838 North Lincoln Avenue.

E.E. Wright, a 28-year-old furniture salesman, was listed as the head of the first household recorded in the house. H had been born in Pennsylvania to parents who had immigrated from England, and his wife, Stella, 25, was at least a second-generation Pennsylvania native. The Wrights had no children, and two of E.E.’s siblings lived with them: Allenn, 30, a furniture salesman, and Agnes, 20, who had no occupation. A.J. Buka, 35, a surgeon, boarded with the family. He was unmarried and had been born in Pennsylvania to German immigrant parents.

Harry R. Irwin, 73, a retiree, was the head of the household in the other apartment. He had been born in Pennsylvania and his wife, M.H., 70, was from Ohio. They had one child at home, a daughter, Harry D. (sic), 46, who had no occupation. William Bosch, 65, a furniture salesman, was a lodger living with the Irwin family.

The 1930 Census

In 1930, Abraham and Gertrude McFerren lived at 838 North Lincoln Avenue. Abraham McFerren, 59, was a traveling salesman working for a hospital supplies company. He had been born in Pennsylvania, as had his parents; Gertrude, 56, had been born in Pennsylvania to parents from Wales and Pennsylvania. Although most houses on North Lincoln Avenue were used as rooming houses by 1930, the census did not record any other residents of the McFerrens’ home.
The 1930 census also reported that 838 North Lincoln Avenue had an estimated value of $40,000.

The 1940 Census

Gertrude McFerren was enumerated at 838 North Lincoln Avenue again in the 1940 census, which listed her age as 71. She was a widow with no occupation, but had income other than from salary or wages. She shared the house with a lodger, Edward Walters, 31, who had no occupation and was not seeking work. He had been born in Pennsylvania. The 1940 census was the first to gather information on education, and reported that Gertrude McFerren had completed five years of college and Edward Walters had finished one year of high school.

In 1940, the estimated value of 838 North Lincoln Avenue was $9000.

The 1940 census is the last census that provides information on occupants of 838 North Lincoln Avenue. Manuscript census records are withheld from public view for 72 years, to protect the privacy of persons who were enumerated.

Neighborhood Development

During and immediately after the Civil War, following the 1858 subdivision of the Irwin family’s rope walk property, North Lincoln Avenue developed as a mixture of middle-class housing and mansions.

Learn More

Supplementary Materials

The following materials accompany this report:

  • a copy of part of an 1852 map depicting Allegheny City
  • a copy of an 1872 plat map of the area around 845 North Lincoln Avenue
  • copies of parts of fire insurance maps of the area around 845 North Lincoln Avenue, published in 1884, 1893, 1906 and 1926, and the 1926 map, updated by the publisher to 1950
  • information on B.F. Jones, from Century Cyclopedia of History and Biography of Pennsylvania (1897)
  • a caricature of, and poem about, B.F. Jones, from All Sorts of Pittsburghers (1892)
  • information on Joseph O. Horne, from History of the National Republican League (1898)
  • information on Rev. Maitland Alexander, from History of Pittsburgh and Environs (1922)
  • Important Engagement is Announced” from the Pittsburgh Press, May 2,1910
  • “H.B. Darlington Ends his Life with a Bullet” from the Pittsburgh Gazette Times, November 15, 1915

A Researched History
By: Carol J. Peterson

all photos by Chris Siewers, unless otherwise noted

The Weihls

Charles George Berthold Weihl was born in Darmstadt, Germany, in 1833 or 1834. Available records provide no information on Weihl’s activities before the late 1850’s, when he settled in Pittsburgh.

Weihl was first listed in the Pittsburgh directory in 1859, as a clerk living at 132 Smithfield Street, Downtown. Weihl was not listed in the 1860 directory, and does not appear to have been enumerated in Pittsburgh in the 1860 census. Weihl, still employed as a clerk, lived at 161 Smithfield Street in 1861.

In about 1862, Charles G.B. Weihl formed a wholesale liquor firm with John Seiferth, who had previously operated a saloon at 87 Third Avenue. The new partnership, John Seifert & Company, began operating in a double commercial-residential building at 27-29 Market Street, Downtown (demolished; at the southwestern comer of Market Street and Boulevard of the Allies). Weihl moved to 27-29 Market Street, also the home of John Seifert.

Charles GB Weihl

Charles GB Weihl

Charles G.B. Weihl purchased property in Allegheny County for the first time in February 1866, when he and John Seiferth bought the 34′ by 70′ lot that their building occupied for $16,050. Over the next 12 years Weihl and Seiferth acquired other property in East Liberty, Lower Saint Clair Township (now the South Side Slopes area), Mifflin Township (now the West Mifflin area) and the Woods Run area of Allegheny City. Weihl and Seiferth acquired most of these parcels in foreclosure proceedings, and it is possible that the two were settling business debts.

Charles G.B. Weihl and Katharine J. Beisel were married no later than 1870. Katharine J. Beisel, about 15 years younger than Charles G.B. Weihl, was born in Pennsylvania, apparently outside the Pittsburgh area, in September 1848. Her parents were born in Wurtemburg, Germany.

Available records suggest the possibility that Charles G.B. Weihl’s marriage to Kate J. Biesel was his second. Weihl’s will, made in 1883, left his estate to his wife and “to all children of mine born from the body of my present beloved wife, Kate J. Weihl.” Although the censuses of 1870 and 1880 document that Weihl had a daughter, Kate, born in about 1867 (when Kate J. Weihl would have been 18), the younger Kate Weihl did not share in her father’s estate. The younger Kate Weihl was still alive in 1885, two years after her father made his will, as documented by her February 17, 1885 wedding to Edmund H. Brackemeyer of Braddock, reported in the Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette.

Local records, including indices of weddings and deaths that were noted in the Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette and its successors, provide no information on any earlier marriage of Charles G.B. Weil.

After marrying, Charles G.B. and Kate J. Weihl lived at 27-29 Market Street. The 1870 federal census of population enumerated the Weihl family at this address. Charles G.B. Weihl, 36, was enumerated as a liquor dealer, and Katharine J. Weihl, 21, had no occupation. The Weihls then had one child, Katharine, three.

Ettie Mathilda Weihl

Ettie Mathilda Weihl as a Girl

In 1870, the Weihl family shared their living quarters with Katharine Weihl’s mother and sister, a boarder, and a servant. Katharine Beisel, 51, was a widow with no occupation, and Louisa Beisel, 17, was a dressmaker. Boarder Emil Walther, 19, worked in a bottling house. He was an immigrant from Darmstadt, Germany. The Weihls’ servant was Barbara Studler, 21, a Bavarian immigrant.

The 1870 manuscript census, the last census to provide information on assets of persons enumerated, reported that Charles G.B. Weihl owned real estate valued at $20,000 and had a personal estate of $15,000. Weihl’s worth of $35,000 was comparable to $1 million or more in the last decade of the twentieth century.

Census records report that Clara L. and Ettie Mathilda, the second and third children of Charles G.B. Weihl, were born at 27-29 Market Street in February 1876 and November 1876 (sic).

Charles G.B. Weihl remained a partner in John Seifert & Company, still at 27-29 Market Street, until 1879. In that year, Weihl left the partnership and founded his own wholesale liquor business at 307 Liberty Avenue, Downtown (on the northern side of Liberty Avenue, halfway between Ninth and Tenth Streets).

At the same time, the Weihl family moved from 27-29 Market Street to a rented house at 31 Federal Street in the lower Hill District (later Fernando Street; on the site of the Civic Arena redevelopment project).

Records of the 1880 census show that the five members of the Weihl family – Charles, 46, Katharine, 31, Katharine, 13, Clara, five, and Ettie, four – lived at 31 Federal Street with Catharine Beisel, 59 (sic), and a servant, Fredericka Weber, 19. Weber was a native of Hesse Cassel, Germany.

Ettie Mathilda Weihl as a Young Woman

Ettie Mathilda Weihl as a Young Woman

The Weihl family moved from Federal Street to 942 Western Avenue after Charles G.B. Weihl purchased the house in June 1881.

Charles G.B. Weihl’s wholesale liquor business moved to 339 Liberty Avenue (at the northwestern comer of Tenth Street and Liberty Avenue) in about 1881. Weihl, however, closed this business by 1883.

The 1883 Pittsburgh directory listed Charles G.B. Weihl as a partner in Weihl & Lippert, which operated a saw factory, the Penn Saw Works, on the present site of the U.S. Steel Building on Grant Street in Downtown Pittsburgh. Weihl’s partner was E. Theodore Lippert of Shaler. Weihl withdrew from this partnership by the following year, and lived in retirement at 942 Western Avenue.

Clara L Weihl Swindell

Clara L Weihl Swindell

An 1886 description of the Penn Saw Works and a 1904 biography of E. Theodore Lippert omitted any mention of Weihl as a partner in the firm.

In 1886, Charles G.B. Weihl acquired a 25′ by 126’ lot on the Temperanceville and Noblestown Plank Road in the West Mansfield section of Robinson Township for $1.

Charles G.B. Weihl died at age 53 on April 23, 1887. His death was not noted in The Alleghenian, a weekly Northside newspaper, and received only brief notices in the daily Pittsburgh newspapers. Allegheny Cemetery records give the cause of Weihl’s death as dropsy.

In his will, Weihl left his estate, including 944 Western Avenue, to his wife and his daughters Clara and Ettie, in equal thirds. Katharine J. Weihl’s interest in the estate required that she not remarry. A widow at 38, she chose not to accept the terms of the will and instead was granted an unconditional one-third interest under Pennsylvania intestate law. In 1898, Clara and Ettie conveyed their interest in the property to their mother.

Ettie Weihl Ridinger with Children

Ettie Weihl Ridinger with Children

Extensive research on the period of construction of 944 Western Avenue does not establish whether construction of the house began before or after Charles G.B. Weihl’s death. Documentation of Weihl’s affluence suggests it is likely that Weihl commissioned the house as a larger residence for himself and his family. It is also possible that Weihl anticipated his death and had the house built as an income-producing property for his wife. Kate J. Weihl may have had the house built after she was widowed for the same reason.

Katharine J. Weihl lived at 942 Western Avenue for over a decade after her husband’s death. In about 1899, she began living with her daughter and son-in-law, Ettie and Charles W. Ridinger, after they moved to a house they purchased or had built at 3418 Perrysville Avenue, Observatory Hill. Charles W. Ridinger, who married Ettie Weihl in 1898, was an electrical engineer.

Edward H Swindell & Charles W Ridinger

Edward H Swindell & Charles W Ridinger

Clara Weihl and Edward H. Swindell were also married in 1898. Edward H. Swindell was a partner in a family-owned business, William Swindle & Brothers, which manufactured and installed regenerative gas furnaces. The Swindells boarded in an un-numbered house in Lincoln Avenue in Bellevue at the time of the 1900 census, and moved to 407 South Pacific Avenue in Friendship by the following year. The family lived at 2228 Perrysville Avenue between 1905 and 1910, and at 6334 Forbes Avenue and 5847 Northumberland Street in Squirrel Hill during the following decade.

In about 1908, the Ridinger family and Kate J. Weihl moved to 5830 Marlborough Street in Squirrel Hill. Kate J. Weihl lived with the Ridinger family for about another decade. In her last years she lived with her daughter, Clara Swindell, and her family. She died in the Swindell home at 5888 Marlborough Avenue in Squirrel Hill on October 16, 1921, at age 73.

944 Western Avenue

944 Western Avenue (Front)

Introduction

944 Western Avenue was constructed between 1884 and 1888, and probably in 1887. The house was built on the western half of a double lot that Charles G.B. Weihl had purchased in 1881. Members of the Weihl family lived at 942 Western Avenue between 1881 and 1898.

Charles G.B. Weihl was a German immigrant and a wholesale liquor dealer. Weihl died in April 1887, and it is not known whether construction of 944 Western Avenue began before or after his death. His widow, Kate J. Weihl, used 944 Western Avenue as a rental property between 1888 and 1921.

Dr. Amasa F. Chandler and his family appear to have been the first occupants of 944 Western Avenue, living in the house in 1888 and 1889. Dr. Chandler, a physician in Ohio for a number of years, did not practice medicine while he lived at 944 Western Avenue. Dr. Chandler was a founder of Charleroi, Washington County, and the Charleroi Plate Glass Company, while he lived at 944 Western Avenue or within a few months afterward.

Later tenants at 944 Western Avenue included the families of Christopher Flinn, a superintendent, and James G. Conner, a fraternity organizer. The house was divided into three apartments between 1910 and 1920.

Detailed information on the ownership history and age of 944 Western Avenue, and on Charles G.B. and Kate Weihl, is contained in the following report.

Ownership

  • December 10, 1867
  • March 2, 1870
  • June 15, 1881
  • April 23, 1887
  • June 27, 1898
  • October 16, 1921
  • April 10, 1923
  • October 9, 1974
  • January 3, 1980
  • August 24, 1995

Elizabeth F. Denny of Pittsburgh conveyed property that included the lot on which 944 Western Avenue now stands to Sarah McKelvy of Allegheny City (now the Northside) for $2,500. The property conveyed was located on the northern side of Western Avenue, 106′ east of Allegheny Avenue, and measured 48′ wide along Western Avenue by 120′ deep to Pasture Alley (now Dounton Way). The property was known as Lots 6 and 7 in Block No. 2 in a plan of lots laid out in the Second Ward of Allegheny City by Mrs. Elizabeth F. Denny (Plan Book 6, Page 193). Lot 6 contained the present site of 944 Western Avenue, and Lot 7 contained the present site of 942 Western Avenue.

(Deed Book Volume 228, Page 207)

Sarah and Hugh McKelvy of Allegheny City conveyed Lots 6 and 7 to Frederick Andriessen of Allegheny City for $11,850. The property contained a house now known as 942 Western Avenue and the present site of 944 Western Avenue.

(DBV 252 P 427)

Frederick and Louisa Andriessen of Allegheny City conveyed Lots 6 and 7 to Charles G.B. Weihl of Pittsburgh for $9,000. The property contained a house now known as 942 Western Avenue and the present site of 944 Western Avenue.

(DBV 418 P 366)

Charles G.B. Weihl died April 23, 1887. Weihl left his estate in equal thirds to his widow, Katharine J. Weihl, so long as she remained his widow, and daughters, then Clara L. Weihl and Ettie Mathilda Weihl (Will Book Volume 31, Page 468). Katharine J. Weihl subsequently declined to accept the terms of the will, and filed her intention to take under the intestate laws of Pennsylvania.

Edward H. and Clara L. (Weihl) Swindell and Charles W. and Ettie M. (Weihl) Ridinger, all of Allegheny City, conveyed their interest in 944 and 942 Western Avenue to Kate J. Weihl, widow, of Allegheny City for $5. This deed also conveyed interest in other property in the Woods Run section of Allegheny City, on Penn Avenue in East Liberty, and on East Carson Street on the South Side.

(DBV 1005 P 153)

Kate J. Weihl died intestate on October 16, 1921. She was survived by Clara L. Swindell and Ettie M. Ridinger. Ettie M. Ridinger died February 27, 1922. In her will dated November 12, 1921 (Will Book Volume 173, Page 300) she left her interest in 944 and 942 Western Avenue to her husband, Charles W. Ridinger.

Clara L. and Edward H. Swindell and Charles W. Ridinger, widower, all of Pittsburgh, conveyed 944 Western Avenue to Julia Augusta Hill, unmarried, of Pittsburgh for $11,000.

(DBV 2164 P 9)

Julia Augusta Hill conveyed 944 Western Avenue to Donald Harrison Cowen for $10,000.

(DBV 5391 P 435)

Donald Harrison Cowen conveyed 944 Western Avenue to Jon Rock Two, a Pennsylvania limited partnership, for $50,500.

(DBV 6208 P 831)

Timothy G. Zinn purchased 944 Western Avenue from Jon Rock Two on August 24, 1995.

(DBV 9527 P 492)

Age of the House

Construction

All available information indicates that 944 Western Avenue was constructed between 1884 and 1888, and probably in 1887.

An 1872 Hopkins plat map shows that 944 Western Avenue had not yet been built. In 1872, the lot on which 944 Western Avenue now stands was owned by Frederick Andriessen, who also owned 942 Western Avenue. Andriessen’s house at 942 Western Avenue is depicted on the 1872 map.

Charles G. B. Weihl purchased the double lot that contained 942 Western Avenue and the site of 944 Western Avenue for $9,000 on June 15, 1881. This purchase price was consistent with or slightly lower than prices paid for other houses in Allegheny West at the time, and indicates that the double lot still contained only 942 Western Avenue.

An 1882 Hopkins plat map and an 1884 Sanborn Map Company insurance map show that 944 Western Avenue remained unbuilt.

The 1887 Pittsburgh city directory listed no residents of 243 (now 944) Western Avenue. The 1888 Pittsburgh city directory listed Dr. Amasa F. Chandler at 243 (944) Western Avenue for the first time.

The 1890 Hopkins plat map confirms that 944 Western Avenue had been built.

Pittsburgh directories show that the family of Charles G.B. Weihl lived at 942 Western Avenue before and after construction of 944 Western Avenue, making it impossible to use the Weihls’ residence to help document when 944 Western Avenue was built.

Allegheny County mortgage records contain no record of any mortgage taken by Charles G.B. Weihl or Ms wife, Kate Weihl, that appears to have financed construction of 944 Western Avenue.

Architectural Style

944 Western Avenue was built in a transitional style, with an exterior that incorporated elements of the Second Empire and Queen Anne styles. The house’s shape, with a depth about three times its width and a mansard roof, is characteristic of an urban version of the Second Empire style that was popular in middle-class and upper-middle-class neighborhoods in Pittsburgh between about 1870 and 1885. Smooth, unomamented stone lintels like those used at 944 Western Avenue are typical of later houses with mansard roofs that were constructed in urban Pittsburgh neighborhoods through the early 1890’s.

The Queen Anne influence at 944 Western Avenue is shown in the elaborate woodwork of the front porch and the ornamentation of the main dormer.

The egg-and-dart terra cotta below the front cornice line and the dentil trim on the porch roof are both atypical of houses built in the Pittsburgh area in the 1880’s.

Interior architectural details of 944 Western Avenue also illustrate a transition between the Second Empire and Queen Anne eras. The house was built with four-panel doors, highly ornamental hinges and round backplates behind doorknobs, all typical of Second Empire and Italianate houses built in Pittsburgh before about 1885. However, the corner blocks, symmetrical door and window trim, handrail, spindles and newel posts of the main stairway and marbleized slate mantels with Eastlake incising are of the type used in construction of homes for upper-middle-class, middle-class and upper-working class families in Pittsburgh between about 1885 and 1895. The Queen Anne style was most popular locally during this period.

Available records do not identify an architect who was credited with design of 944 Western Avenue.

Street Numbering

The present house numbering on Western Avenue is the fourth on the street.

Pittsburgh directory listings of Western Avenue residents indicate the first street numbers on the street were put in place in the late 1860’s. The 1872 Hopkins plat map depicts what appears to have been the earliest street numbers on Western Avenue; the present 942 Western Avenue was numbered 203, and if 944 Western Avenue had been built, it would have been numbered 201.

A second numbering system was in place by 1884, as shows by a Sanborn fire insurance map published that year. The present 942 Western Avenue was known as 100 Western Avenue, and 944 Western Avenue would have been assigned number 102.

Directory listings suggest the next numbering change on Western Avenue took place in 1886. The present 944 Western Avenue is shown as 243 Western Avenue on the 1890 Hopkins map, and 942 Western Avenue was numbered 247.

The present street numbering system was put in place in Allegheny West and other lower North Side neighborhoods in 1899.

Nearby streets such as Beech and North Lincoln Avenues have had only two house numbering schemes. The first, in place between the late 1860’s and 1899, numbered houses in ascending order from 1 to about 101 eastward from Allegheny Avenue. Known records do not provide information on any reason for the frequent numbering changes on Western Avenue.

The Home Today

Photos by Chris Siewers

Residents

The Weihls

Pittsburgh city directories, U.S. census records, and other materials provide information on Charles G.B. Weihl and his wife, Katharine J. Weihl.

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1888-1889

Pittsburgh city directories and the 1889 social register show that Dr. Amasa F. Chandler and his family rented 944 Western Avenue from Kate J. Weihl in 1888 and 1889. Dr. Chandler and his family appear to have been the first residents of 944 Western Avenue.

Dr. Amasa F. Chandler lived in Ohio prior to his 1888 move to Allegheny City. After he moved to Allegheny City, he helped found the Charleroi Plate Glass Company and the city of Charleroi, Washington County. Dr. Chandler moved from Western Avenue to Charleroi in 1889 or 1890, and died in Charleroi in 1890.

More information on Dr. Amasa F. Chandler and his family is contained in biographical materials and information on the history of Charleroi, included with this report.

1890

The 1890 manuscript census, which would provide information on residents of 944 Western Avenue in that year, was destroyed in a warehouse fire following its completion.

1900-1905

The family of Christopher Flinn rented 944 Western Avenue at the time of the 1900 census.

Christopher Flinn, 45, was enumerated as a superintendent. He had been born in Pennsylvania to Irish immigrant parents. His wife, Lucy, 40, had been born in Ohio to parents born in Maryland.

In 1900, Christopher and Lucy Flinn had been married for 20 years and had had six children. Five of their children were alive at the time of the census, and lived at home.

Francis, 19, was the oldest child of Christopher and Lucy Flinn. He was employed as a draftsman. Marie, 17, Antonette (sic), 16, Margarette, 10, and Julia, eight, attended school.

The 1900 census did not enumerate any servants or other non-family members at 944 Western Avenue.

Pittsburgh city directories listed Christopher Flinn as a superintendent living at 944 Western Avenue between 1900 and 1905. The 1902 directory shows that Flinn was employed at 3335 Preble Avenue in the Woods Run section of Allegheny City. This address does not correspond to any Preble Avenue addresses depicted in a 1905 Sanborn fire insurance map. Other directories did not list Flinn’s work address.

Christopher Flinn was not listed in Pittsburgh directories published before 1900 or after 1905.

1910

In 1910, according to census records, 944 Western Avenue was rented to James G. Conner.

James G. Conner, 57, was a fraternity organizer. He and his wife, Narcissa E., 52, had both been born in Pennsylvania, as had their parents.

In 1910, James G. and Narcissa E. Conner had been married 36 years and had had two children. Both of their children, Frank F. and Narcissa B., were single and lived at home. Neither had an occupation.

Pittsburgh directory listings suggest the Conner family’s stay at 944 Western Avenue was very short. James G. Conner was never listed in directories at 944 Western Avenue. The 1910 directory listed Conner at 918 Beech Avenue, and with no occupation. Conner had lived at 1905 Saint Clair Terrace (now Saint Ives Street, near the General Mail Facility on California Avenue) a year earlier, and was listed as a clerk. He was not listed in the 1911 directory.

1920

The 1920 census enumerated a total of 11 persons living in three apartments at 944 Western Avenue.

The first apartment at 944 Western Avenue was occupied by a family headed by Jerry Cochran, a single 52-year-old machinist. Cochran shared his living quarters with his widowed sister, Lula Hulego, 53, and widowed mother, Margaret Cochran, 76. Both women had no occupation. All three family members had been born in Pennsylvania.

Joseph Sullivan, 41, was the head of the second household at 944 Western Avenue. Sullivan was a traveling salesman who had been born in Massachusetts. His wife, Sarah, 33, had been born in New York State. Sarah Sullivan had no occupation. The couple had two children, Frances, three, and Bettie, 19 months.

The third apartment at 944 Western Avenue was rented to George Jones, a 35-year-old plumbing superintendent. Jones was a native of Ohio. Mary T., 29, his wife, had been born in Canada, and came to the United States in 1905. She had no occupation.

George and Mary T. Jones were childless, and shared their living quarters with two lodgers at the time of the 1920 census. Their lodgers were Catherine Glosser, 32, and Margaret Harshaw, 30. Both were single and worked as salesladies in department stores. Both lodgers had been born in Pennsylvania.

1930

Records of the 1930 census show that 944 Western Avenue was rented to George and Grace E. Everett. The Everetts paid $130 per month to rent 944 Western Avenue, and shared the house with nine roomers.

George Everett, 46, was a laborer in a piano store. Grace E. Everett, 48, managed 944 Western Avenue, which the Everetts used as a rooming house. George and Grace E. Everett had both been born in Pennsylvania, as had their parents. The couple had no children who lived at home.

Roomers who lived at 944 Western Avenue in 1930 were:

  • Cecelia A. Mathews, 29, who was divorced and worked as saleslady in a department store
  • Elizabeth J. Mathews, eight, a daughter of Cecelia A. Mathews
  • David Harris, 37, a laborer employed in building construction
  • Margaret Harris, 30, his wife, who had no occupation

  • Robert J. Clarke, 31, a clerk employed by a mine and mill supply company
  • Zada A. Clarke, 25, his wife, who had no occupation
  • Doris M. Clarke, six, their daughter
  • Bessie M. Thomas, 36, a divorced woman who was a saleswoman in a dry goods store
  • Gladys G. Thomas, 16, her daughter, an operator in a beauty parlor

George and Grace E. Everett, Cecelia A. and Elizabeth J. Mathews, and David and Margaret Harris were all natives of Pennsylvania. Robert J. Clarke had been born in Pennsylvania, and Zada A. Clarke had been born in Ohio. Their daughter Doris was born in Pennsylvania. Bessie M. and Gladys G. Thomas were both natives of Maryland.

Census records also indicate that Robert J. Clarke was the only resident of 944 Western Avenue who owned a radio.

Neighborhood Development

944 Western Avenue was built more than two decades after the Allegheny West area began to develop as a genteel alternative to sections of Allegheny City like the east and south commons and the Anderson Street area, which were crowded and contained mixed residential, commercial and industrial uses by the end of the Civil War. While Ridge Avenue and Brighton Road became the home of some of the wealthiest residents of the Pittsburgh area, and Beech Avenue homes were built for middle-class families, Western Avenue developed as a somewhat unlikely mixture of mansions, homes of middle-class and working-class families, and small industrial sites. North Lincoln Avenue was developed with a mixture of mansions and middle-class housing.

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Supplementary Materials

The following materials accompany this report:

Maps

  • a copy of an 1852 map of the Allegheny City area
  • a copy of an 1872 plat map of part of Allegheny West
  • a copy of an 1884 Sanborn fire insurance map of the area around 944 Western Avenue
  • a copy of a 1925 plat map of the area around 944 Western Avenue

Dr. Amasa F. Chandler

  • a copy of the 1889 Pittsburgh social register listing of members of the Chandler family at 243 (944) Western Avenue
  • information on Amasa F. Chandler and his sons, Lee L. and Sellers McKee Chandler, from Encyclopedia of Pennsylvania Biography (1916)
  • articles on early development of Charleroi, from the Pittsburgh Press, December 20, 1925 and March 11, 1934
  • information on development of Charleroi, from Charleroi – the First 100 Years (1990)

Charles G.B. and Kate Weihl

  • information on John Seiferth, former partner of Charles G.B. Weihl in John Seifert & Company, from Industries of Pittsburgh, 1879-80
  • a copy of the 1880 Pittsburgh directory listing of Charles G.B. Weihl
  • the notice of the wedding of the younger Kate Weihl and Edmund H. Brackemeyer, from the Pittsburgh Commercial Gazette, February 19, 1885
  • information on the Penn Saw Works, from Pennsylvania Historical Review (1886)
  • the death notice of Charles G.B. Weihl, from the Pittsburgh Post, April 25, 1887
  • information of William Swindle & Brothers, from Pittsburgh of Today (1896)
  • a biography of E. Theodore Lippert, former partner of Charles G.B. Weihl in the Penn Saw Works, from Memoirs of Allegheny County (1904)
  • the obituary of Katherine J. Weihl, from the Pittsburgh Press, October 18, 1921

William Lyons

  • an article about the sucicide of William Lyons from The Pittsburgh Daily Post, October 19, 1891

A Researched History
By: Carol J. Peterson

all photos by Chris Siewers, unless otherwise noted