info@alleghenywest.org
806 Western Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15233

Free Tickets for Northsiders: The Light in the Piazza

The Light in the Piazza

Presented by Front Porch Theatricals
August 23, 27 and 29

The Light in the Piazza tells the story of Margaret Johnson and her daughter Clara, a pair of wealthy women from the American south. Together, they encounter the charm of Italy and the famiglia Naccarelli while learning about themselves and each other. This poignant, romantic, and sometimes humorous tale is set during an emotionally-charged summer in 1953.

You’re Invited

Thanks to the generous support of the Buhl Foundation, Northside residents and workers are invited to attend this performance for free. A limited number of tickets are available online, so reserve your seat today.

 Sunday, August 23 at 2:00 pm  Thursday, August 27 at 8:00 pm  Saturday, August 29 at 2:00 pm

August 16, 2015

Check It Out: Northside Community Asset Map

Northside Map Illustration

One Northside AIM LogoAs many of you are aware, the One Northside initiative invited GTECH to coordinate a summer internship experience for Landscape Architecture students from three universities this summer, specifically to look at the resources that make Northside neighborhoods unique. The Asset Inventory and Mapping (AIM) project catalogued and then plotted out the destinations, resources, services and other local items of interest based on surveys of residents.

The final Community Asset Map was unveiled last week at the People, Places, Spaces event held at City of Asylum but if you missed the in-person reveal, you can also check out the interactive map online!

 Community Asset Map – One Northside AIM
August 14, 2015

Free Tickets for Northsiders: The Reduction

The Reduction

Part of the Community Supported Art Performance Series
August 13  |  8PM

With a small cast, David Bernabo crafts a semi-autobiographical, mixed-media movement theater production that presents characters in parallel states. Forces both abstract and concrete push performers in and out of storylines as the audience is guided through a range of actions, false paths, and surprises.

You’re Invited

Thanks to the generous support of the Buhl Foundation, Northside residents and workers are invited to attend this performance for free. A limited number of tickets are available online, so reserve your seat today.

 Thursday, August 13 at 8:00 pm  Buy a Share in the CSA

August 2, 2015

Free Tickets for Northsiders: The Merchant of Venice

The Merchant of Venice

Presented by Urban Impact Shakes
A Performing Arts Program of Allegheny Center Alliance Church
August 7th and 8th

Revenge meets Gossip Girl in Urban Impact Shakes’ production of The Merchant of Venice. Shakespeare’s tale of love and bitterness, choice and fate, takes on new meaning as the actors connect the story to their own lives. Come eager to laugh, quick to empathize, ready to ask questions of faith, and to snap a selfie or two!

You’re Invited

Thanks to the generous support of the Buhl Foundation, Northside residents and workers are invited to attend this performance for free. A limited number of tickets are available online, so reserve your seat today.

 Friday, August 7 at 8:00 pm  Saturday, August 8th at 8:00 pm

July 27, 2015

Free Tickets for Northsiders: Strength & Grace

Strength & Grace

Presented by Texture Contemporary Ballet
July 16, 17 and 19

Two Shows, One Night…

Strength & Grace features choreography by Alan Obuzor, Kelsey Bartman, and Gabriel Gaffney Smith. With music by Mertens, Pierri, Meyers, Piazzolla, as well as arrangements by musician Ben Hardt and live vocals sung by Krysta Bartman.

You’re Invited

Thanks to the generous support of the Buhl Foundation, Northside residents and workers are invited to attend this performance for free. A limited number of tickets are available online, so reserve your seat today.

 Thursday, July 16 at 7:30 pm  Friday, July 17 at 8:00 pm  Sunday, July 19 at 2:00 pm

July 15, 2015

Letter from the President – July 2015

So I get to talk to a lot of interesting people since I finally managed to figure out the phone system enough to get the AWCC office number forwarded to my cell phone. One of the most common types of calls we get is from neighbors who have questions about complying with the historic guidelines for renovations. Well, aside from the electric company scammers trying to get me to tell then our account number so they can process our “rebate”: seriously, guys, if you were Duquesne Light you would KNOW our account number ALREADY. Anyway. Those calls from neighbors – coupled with the fact that I seem to have spent more than the normal amount of time this month in meetings that have “Enforcement” as an agenda item – means that I have been doing a lot of thinking about why it’s so important, as a property owner in the neighborhood, to continue to follow the historic district guidelines. So, even though it was, frankly, really frustrating that, in order to replace the person-door on our garage (of which approximately one square foot of was actually visible from the street) we ended up paying more in permit fees than the door itself cost AND we missed the deadline for the May Historic Review Committee agenda so we didn’t actually manage to get the approval in time to get the door replaced for the wine tour which was the entire point of replacing the door in the first place…

Anyway.

My point is that it can sometimes be challenging to explain to new neighbors, or even neighbors who have been here a while, WHY those rules are so important to follow even though they can be inconvenient and expensive. There’s some really interesting (well at least to me, but I’m kind of an archaeology nerd) work being done looking at the positive effect that enforcing historic preservation guidelines have on local property values. If you’re the kind of person that finds abstract evidence based arguments compelling a quick Google search on “historic preservation property values” should keep you happy for a good long while. Honestly, though, I’d really like some help making a more visceral case to folks about why the guidelines are important whether it’s a new neighbor or our new building inspector from BBI. I think, for the neighbors who have spent the last 30+ years watching their hard work come to fruition, the need to enforce the historic guidelines is obvious. But when we moved in even 7 years ago, Allegheny West was already gorgeous; our street was described as “the most beautiful street in Pittsburgh”. Our house was (and still is – we appreciate your patience!) one of the few houses not completely restored on Beech.

I realized this month though that the only photos I’ve seen of Allegheny West are either from the very early days of the neighborhood, 1870-1910 – before urban “renewal” (ha!) and the collapse of the steel industry wreaked havoc – or more recent photos meant to showcase the neighborhood for tours or the website. What I haven’t seen and what I’m hoping neighbors (you!) can provide are essentially the “before” pictures from the time period when the historic preservation guidelines went into effect. Before AWCC spent 50 years putting on tours and buying and stabilizing properties with the proceeds. Before neighbors got together on Saturdays to literally hand build brick sidewalks. Before folks wrote grants and property owners paid assessments to completely redo Western Avenue’s infrastructure. As part of the lead up to the 50th Anniversary of AWCC we’d like to share some of those “before” pictures. If you have photos of your house, interior or exterior, or even better, of the street, from “before” it was renovated please send them to: president@alleghenywest.org. We’d like to start a section in the newsletter and on the website of “Then and Now” so that we have something concrete to point to about what can happen to our neighborhood without the protection of the Historic District guidelines.

Catherine Serventi
President, AWCC

Neighborhood Cleanup!

Submitted by Michael Shealey

Saturday, July 25th at 9:30 am

The July neighborhood cleanup will be held from 9:30 – 11:00 am on Saturday, July 25th. We will be both picking up trash and cleaning a few tree wells, if possible. Gather at the AWCC office at 806 Western Avenue (next to the parklet). Refreshments will be provided.

July 9, 2015